Posts Tagged ‘Franchisee’

Another day of training logo with computer

When the COVID-19 pandemic first hit, businesses all over the world had to figure out how to modify their processes quickly while continuing to move forward.

Goddard Systems, Inc. (GSI) employees were at the forefront of these changes, ensuring we were meeting the needs of our learners while keeping attendee interactions strong. Pre-pandemic, we conducted in-person training sessions for new franchisees and School education directors. With everyone socially distancing, GSI swiftly adapted to this rapidly changing new environment. Tracey Grill, the GSU trainer-onboarding, and Donna Crosson, the corporate franchise trainer, stepped in to guide the Goddard system through this transition. “I have the greatest job in the world,” Donna said. Donna used her training experience and expertise to guide the team and assist them in tapping into that passion and enthusiasm in order to create powerful virtual training tools for new franchisees and directors.

What We’re Doing Differently 

Without a classroom environment, the team focused on finding ways to connect with franchisees digitally. They found that using a well-balanced mix of different platforms in conjunction with face-to-face virtual meetings helped recreate the feel of the in-person classroom. They also introduced a mix of interactive icebreakers and activities to keep the learners engaged during training while helping them make vital connections with one another.

It is a people-first approach. Participants come with varied professional experiences that impact how they receive and retain information. The team connects with the participants first, which informs how technology is used to deliver content. Franchisees must walk away with the tools they need to be able to hit the ground running when their Schools open and need to feel like they’re truly part of the Goddard family. They can then carry the same kind of familial atmosphere into their Schools.

What Our Challenges Were and How We Overcame Them 

Of course, this new way of doing things wasn’t without its speed bumps. For example, with franchisees tuning into training remotely from all over the country, connectivity issues can sometimes arise. The team ensures that all the franchisees have dial-in options and hard copy materials available if they aren’t able to access the training digitally.

There’s also the matter of the dreaded meeting fatigue, which can set in when conducting online meetings. To minimize this, the training team strategically schedules the flow and timing of the training sessions to make them more digestible while giving the franchisees a break to absorb the information they learn. Learning activities are also carefully planned to maximize opportunities to interact with the presenters and one another.

Speaking of information, Donna coordinates with various subject matter experts to ensure virtual delivery tips and tricks are shared with the entire training team. After each session, the feedback informs adjustments that can be made to enhance the experience. Continuous improvement is always at the forefront to ensure the most impactful learning experience for participants.

What We’ve Learned and How We’re Moving Forward 

The main takeaway that Donna, Tracey and the team of presenters learned from this experience is that while face-to-face training is preferred, virtual training can be just as successful and fun. It has also forced them to think outside the box to find new, creative ways to connect with franchisees through interactive activities. They plan to continue to use those activities to link each phase of training to the next while continuing to use self-study assignments to bridge the gap between training sessions. In true Goddard Systems fashion, virtual training has been a perfect example of how learning opportunities can be found anywhere – even in the comfort of your home.

 

GSI Women In Franchising – Snohomish, WA

Wednesday, May 13th, 2020

GSI Women in Franchising

In our second edition of GSI’s Women in Franchising, we’re highlighting Erin Goulet and Lissa Knox, on-site owners of The Goddard School located in Snohomish, WA. We asked this mother-daughter team to tell us about their experience as female entrepreneurs and advice they would give other women who have similar ambitions.

GSI: How has Goddard supported your dreams of being an entrepreneur?

Goulet & Knox: The Goddard opportunity represents an alignment of so many values that are important to us as entrepreneurs. It has created an opportunity to serve families in our community in a meaningful way, to create a supportive workplace for our team and to receive support and guidance from a franchisor that reflects our values. Within our market of Goddard Schools here in the Pacific Northwest we have had the opportunity to collaborate closely with our peers which has been incredibly fulfilling and strengthens what we are all able to offer to our communities.

GSI: How have you grown as a leader and business owner since opening your own Goddard School?

Goulet & Knox: We have experienced how transformative it is to give to others. This is true for our individual business, that doing our best to serve our employees and our families to the best of our abilities are the path to a successful program. We have also experienced this to be true as franchisees within a larger system. The effective partnership among our peers and across our system drives the success of our entire brand. We have also experienced how fulfilling this kind of meaningful partnership can be to our experience as business owners.

GSI: What guidance would you give other women who are driven to become entrepreneurs?

Goulet & Knox: Surround yourself with likeminded women who share your goals and your values in business. Learn from them and do your best to support them and genuinely celebrate their success. This kind of meaningful collaboration makes the work both more manageable and more fulfilling. We are incredibly fortunate to be a part of a network of strong female entrepreneurs through our relationships with our fellow franchisees. We also serve a community of parents that include many women in leadership and entrepreneurial roles. We feel great pride in being a part of these communities of like-minded women.

Portrait photo of woman
Janice Kennedy, owner of The Goddard School located in Olathe (Northwest), KS, reflects upon how her six years in the US Army Reserve prepared her for owning a Goddard franchise in this fascinating article for Authority Magazine.

CLICK HERE TO READ MORE>>>>

Owner and director working

Franchisees like Priya Punugoti, owner of the newest Goddard School located in Lewisville, TX, exemplify the type of ambitious, altruistic entrepreneur that the brand attracts.

CLICK HERE TO READ MORE>>>>

What To Do With Negative Social Media Feedback

Thursday, January 31st, 2019

1.31.19 Post.png

Social media is a way for your clients and customers to communicate with you. But what happens when what they want to say is negative? Like, really negative?

The risk that comes with social media is that you can’t control what people say, and you can’t control who sees it. Maybe you delete or block negative users, but that can create a whole new type of blow back- why aren’t you facing the criticism? Blocking doesn’t equal solving the problem.

Instead of running from the problem, here’s hat to do with negative social media feedback.

Don’t Ignore Them

First things first; you can’t run from the negative feedback. You have to face the music. Try to understand what people are mad about; are they dissatisfied with your services? Do they feel like you mislead them about your experience? Are they mad at something you said in an interview?

Take the time to HEAR what they are saying, and see how you can address it. Maybe it’s something out of your hands, like USPS taking longer to deliver because of weather conditions. Or maybe it’s because of your attitude towards your customers. Feedback (even negative feedback) can be a great way to grow, but you first need to listen.

Take a Pause- But Don’t Wait Too Long

Small companies may have just one person who does all the work. Meaning you might be on deadline when you start getting a flood of negative comments for something else. You have to finish the work, but you can’t take too long to answer the comments, because things can get out of control easily.

However, one of the biggest mistakes you can make is to respond when you feel heated yourself! No good comes from yelling back at someone yelling at you on the internet.

Read the comments, take some time to formulate your response, and then click ‘send’ when you’re calm and can stand behind what you’ve written. Saying something in the heat of the moment is bad business. Especially on the internet, where things never really die. Even if you delete your comment later, screenshots can easily be taken.

Be Ready to Admit Fault…Or to Stick To Your Guns

If you said or did something that was offensive, be ready to apologize. Step outside of your experience, understand that you hurt people, and apologize.

However, if the negative social media feedback is totally unwarranted, you can defend yourself! But remember that you don’t want to antogonize them further. Defend yourself by saying something like this: “I understand that you’re frustrated with delays, but once it’s mailed I no longer have direct control over it. I also can’t control the weather (I wish!) I’m happy to offer you free shipping off your next purchase!”

A response like this allows space for their frustrations, but also gently guides them away from blaming you. You also offer a perk to them, which is a good PR move. It says “I understand and I want to help you avoid feeling this again.”

Negative social media feedback is a part of our online world. But handling it gracefully is a way to keep your business running smoothly and your customers happy.

This article originally appeared in Due.

 

This article was written by Kara Perez from Business2Community and was legally licensed through the NewsCred publisher network. Please direct all licensing questions to legal@newscred.com.

Blank Black Image

Man smiling during conversation

If you run a small business, you probably have become accustomed to working hard….really hard. Seven-days-a-week hard, with nary a day off. Admirable, but also dangerous, because you risk burnout, health problems, and grumbling employees. It’s up to you to create a healthier work-life balance, so here are five tips to get you started:

Shorten your workweek:

Nowadays, many business owners feel guilty if they work less than 10 hours a day, including weekends. This is sure to exhaust your mind and hamper your creativity. If you want to increase your productivity, shorten your workweek. Put in no more than 40 per week and try to not work on weekends. Remember, sitting at your desk for long hours doesn’t equate to productivity. Work the hours you actually need to and relax the rest of the time.

Use technology:

We live in the high-tech era, so let technology do some of the heavy lifting for you. Automate your workday with a suite of apps that collect, process and distribute information. AI apps can automatically generate your Twitter tweets, schedule your appointments and alert you to important news. Update your old apps – email campaigns are much more sophisticated than they were five years ago, so use a modern app to manage your email marketing.

Enter the cloud:

Are your data and apps still residing on a hard disk on your computer? That’s a shame because migrating to the cloud opens up all sorts of possibilities that can make you more productive and save you time. Look at apps like accounting, CRM, design, and development. They need to share data to operate most efficiently. By putting your databases on the cloud, you can take advantage of scalable software that is constantly updated and doesn’t take up valuable real estate on your computer.

Take a vacation:

If you feel you are indispensable all the time, you’ll never get any time off. You deserve a vacation, and two weeks of sun and fun will do wonders for helping you get through the remaining 50. Pick your least busy time of year, and either close up shop or assign tasks to employees you can trust. Maybe two weeks is out of reach right now, but try to get at least three or four days in a block, and build from there.

Stop fretting about money:

Many small businesses have variable cash flows that sometimes leaves them cash-starved. This constant worry will drain all the joy out of being a business owner. The solution is to create a relationship with a trustworthy business lender, like IOU Financial. You can borrow and pay back quickly on convenient terms, with never a pre-payment penalty. Daily or weekly payments mean no large monthly lump-sum repayments to worry about. And with loans up to $300,000, we can give you peace of mind for just about any circumstance.

You started your own business to make money, be your own boss and do things the way you want. But wasn’t the ultimate goal to achieve a happy life? Don’t wait until it’s too late – add some joy to your life right now. Adopt our five tips, plus ones you come across in other articles. If you work with a team, what better way to demonstrate the value you place on work-life balance than to practice it yourself? Protect yourself from burnout now, and you’re more likely to happily remain in business over the long run.

This article originally appeared in IOU Financial.

 

This article was written by Kaitlyn Hammond from Business2Community and was legally licensed through the NewsCred publisher network. Please direct all licensing questions to legal@newscred.com.

Blank Black image

Management Tip: Calmness Counts

Thursday, December 13th, 2018

Man sitting on top of desk with tea cup

Over the years I’ve spoken with a small army of people who’ve told me essentially the same thing: They had a good job but they just couldn’t take the agitated, excitable, too-high-octane temperament of their boss.

Or to put it another, simpler way, as the old management saying goes, “People leave managers, not companies.”

It was a phenomenon I came upon repeatedly as I was researching my book The Type B Manager. Too much intensity can wear employees down. While calmness is something employees can rarely get too much  of. The more, the better.

This makes good sense when you realize that, at its core, management is all about accomplishing work through others. Following are three reasons why calmness is a substantive managerial asset.

It’s reassuring.  Calmness inspires confidence. It’s a leadership style people want to follow. In most jobs (less so in the remote working world of course), you spend a lot of time with your boss. It’s only natural to want to feel comfortable about that — rather than having your stomach perpetually tied in knots.

It creates a better environment to solve business problems.  It helps employees (and organizations) make good decisions. The best decisions are well-thought-out and analytical, calmly and rationally made. Impulsive decisions made in the heat of the moment (why do I keep thinking of a certain president here?) are generally not the best way for any management to operate.

It’s conducive to loyalty and productivity. Employees respond well to calmness. Over the long term it’s a pleasant, easy attribute to work with. Employees are apt to remain loyal to a calm, effective manager. And long-term loyalty breeds productivity.

Calmness isn’t one of those big marquee qualities we tend to hear a lot about when celebrating rock star executives. But it probably should be.

 

This article was written by Victor Lipman from Forbes and was legally licensed through the NewsCred publisher network. Please direct all licensing questions to legal@newscred.com.

Blank Black Image

Goddard 30 year anniversary convention logo width=

Goddard Systems, Inc.’s (GSI), the franchisor of The Goddard School, annual franchisee convention was held in Nassau, Bahamas. Recipients of its yearly awards were announced to honor model franchisees who contribute to their communities through service-based projects and provide high-quality childcare with leading health and safety practices.

Goddard School franchisees attend the convention because they know it is essential to running a successful business.

“Ideas generated in workshops and time spent with fellow owners keep you up on latest trends and changes in the industry/business. Networking is paramount at these events and provides so much connection amongst GSI and Franchisees,” said Barbra Bryan from Mooresville, NC.

GSI is proud to present the 2018 convention award categories and winners:

Brand Ambassador Award

·         Vince and Nancy Radosta, Castle Rock, CO

Humanitarian Award

·         Leisa Byars, Hendersonville, TN

·         Anthony and Ada Vassallo, Norwood, NJ

Leadership Award

·         John Agaman, Sparks, NV

Philip Schumacher Award

·         Shauna and Jeff Barison, Redmond Ridge, WA

Rookie of the Year Award

·         Brooks Coatney, Fayetteville, AR

Circle of Excellence for Education Award

·         Dolly and Monty Kalsi, Bethlehem, PA

·         Mark and Wendy Reinhart, Anderson Township, OH

·         Mike and Janelle Glasser, Bare Hills, MD

·         Butch and Maria Aggen, Cedar Park, TX

·         Jim and Debbie Womack, Chesterfield, VA

·         Dina and Matt Speranza, Cranberry Township, PA

·         Amber and Dave O’Brien, Forest Hill, MD

·         Jim and Jill Worley, Gaithersburg, MD

·         Susan Hoy and Tim Hoy, Hillsborough, NJ

·         Michael Smithers, Ladera Ranch, CA

·         Kellie McDonald, Lake Orion, MI

·         Dipti Singh, Millersville, MD

·         Shauna and Jeff Barison, Redmond Ridge, WA

·         Ryan and Chelli Motherway, South Reno, NV

·         Denise Cross, Reno (Somersett), NV

·         Melanie and Bill Hyatt, Simpsonville, SC

·         Lissa Knox and Erin Goulet, Snohomish, WA

·         John, Jody and Kristen Agaman, Sparks, NV

·         Ted and Robin Ray, Sugar Hill, GA

·         David and Donna Raye, Third Lake, IL

·         Fran and Bryant Lubbs, Wayne, PA

Circle of Excellence for Operations Award

·         Olivia Teja and Kamal Desilva, Bellevue, WA

·         Angela Norman, Centerville, OH

·         Kate Joseph, Cincinnati, OH

·         Jim and Jill Worley, Gaithersburg, MD

·         Jyoti Verma, Henderson, NV

·         Kellie McDonald, Lake Orion, MI

·         Sheeba Mathew, Marriottsville, MD

·         Dipti Singh, Millersville, MD

·         Wendy Somers, Newtown, PA

·         Bob and Lori Santo, Peters Township, PA

·         Melanie and Bill Hyatt, Simpsonville, SC

·         Pete Joseph, South Lebanon, OH

·         John, Jody and Kristen Agaman, Sparks, NV

·         Ted and Robin Ray, Sugar Hill, GA

Circle of Excellence President’s Club Award

·         Jim and Jill Worley, Gaithersburg, MD

·         Kellie McDonald, Lake Orion, MI

·         Dipti Singh, Millersville, MD

·         Melanie and Bill Hyatt, Simpsonville, SC

·         John, Jodi and Kristen Agaman, Sparks, NV

·         Ted and Robin Ray, Sugar Hill, GA

Outstanding Market Award – Phoenix, AZ

·         Nicole and Matt Bigham and Beth and Vince Valentino, Buckeye (Verrado), AZ

·         Jake Thompson, Cave Creek, AZ

·         Todd and Christine Goldberg, Chandler, AZ

·         Van Phan, Gilbert (Higley), AZ

·         Penny Mekhanik, Gilbert (East Germann), AZ

·         Karen and Keith Latchaw, Gilbert (Warner), AZ

·         Natalia Elfimova, Scottsdale, AZ

·         JoEllen Johnson, Goodyear, AZ

Outstanding Customer Experience Award

·         Todd and Christine Goldberg, Chandler, AZ

Director of the Year Award

·         Stacey Molnar (director), Karyn Smykowski and Suzanne Hanf (owners), Toms River, NJ

Anthony A. Martino Scholarship Award

·         Sabreena Leach and Cindy Pyatt, Oakville, MO

 

“As proven by this year’s honorees, choosing to operate a School is more than just a good business decision,” said Joe Schumacher, CEO of GSI. “Our franchisees choose to make a profound impact on the lives of future generations.”

The Goddard School focuses on learning through play for children from six weeks to six years old. This year marks the system’s 30th anniversary in business. Learn more about franchising opportunities with The Goddard School at www.goddardschoolfranchise.com

Innovative Ideas 2018 Title ImageCheck out VP of Marketing, Advertising and Public Relations, Paul Koulogeorge’s latest article in Forbes, Get Inspired By Borrowing These Innovative Ideas In 2018, where he shares some marketing strategies that are worth taking a look at this year.

Goddard Systems’ VP of Marketing, Paul Koulogeorge shares digital thought starters for 2018 with Forbes Magazine.

CLICK HERE TO READ MORE >>>>marketing