Posts Tagged ‘entrepreneurs’

Goddard School

The Goddard School located in Northlake officially opened on Friday, Nov. 1, and is now enrolling!

Susie Patton and Kaylin Walker, onsite owners of the newest Goddard School, previously taught elementary school children before deciding to open an early childhood education facility of their own. They saw there was a need in their community for a high-quality early childhood education program that provides a play-based learning experience in a nurturing environment.

“Deciding to make the switch from our previous profession, we were comforted in knowing that we would still be working with children and providing what children need – a safe and nurturing environment where they are encouraged to develop a love for learning,” Susie said.

“We want to reach as many children as possible and provide the best-in-class programs to area children,” Kaylin said.

For more than 30 years, The Goddard School has used the most current, academically endorsed methods to ensure that children from six weeks to six years old have fun while learning the skills they need for long-term success in school and in life. Talented teachers collaborate with parents to nurture children into respectful, confident and joyful learners.

Ground-breaking for The Goddard School Lees Summit 3

If you were nearby NE Ralph Powell Road between Woods Chapel and Strother roads in Lee’s Summit on Tuesday, you might have caught a glimpse of construction underway and some people spiking gold shovels into the ground.

A groundbreaking ceremony was held on Tuesday, Oct. 29, to celebrate the construction of the newest Goddard School coming to Lee’s Summit (Lakewood).

The formal ceremony took place at the site of the new School, 3301 NE Ralph Powel Road, where more than a dozen people gathered to join in on the celebration. Those attending the event included members of the Chamber of Commerce, Lee’s Summit City Councilman Rob Binney, community members, along with family and friends of the owners, Abby and Shane Hendren.

“We saw a wonderful opportunity for a sustainable, lifelong business that would add value to the area we love and contribute to our community,” Abby said.

Owners at groundbreaking for The Goddard School Lees Summit 3

Abby will serve as the on-site of the School. Abby and her husband, Shane, saw there was a need for a high-quality early childhood education program that provides a play-based learning experience in a nurturing environment. That’s why they decided to open up a Goddard School.

The School has an anticipated opening date of spring 2020 and will be open from 7 a.m. to 6 p.m. At capacity, the 10,000 square-foot-building will serve 170 children ages six months to six years old.

Once complete, the School’s décor will be themed around the Missouri outdoors and include wildlife native to the state and various natural wonders only found in Missouri – from the Ozark Mountains to Missouri forests, caves, lakes and more. The interior will be reflective of Missouri’s wildlife and landscapes and include cedar posts and natural stone accents.

Follow the construction progress on Facebook via The Goddard School (Lee’s Summit – Lakewood)

 

 

Plaque on building for Monal B Patel

Bhavesh Patel has been working toward his goal of opening his Goddard School located in Granger, IN for three years, in memory of his late wife.

>>>Read more of the story here<<<

Wall of The Goddard School of Bala Cynwyd, PA

Goddard Systems, Inc., the franchisor of The Goddard School, is looking back on more than 30 years of success in early childhood education franchising as it proudly announces the opening of the 500th location in Bala Cynwyd, PA.

Read the full article at TapInto.net

Ribbon cutting photo for the gym at The Goddard School West Windsor

Rain or snow will no longer stop children from running, jumping, playing and even climbing their energy away at The Goddard School located in West Windsor, NJ, now that there’s a spacious indoor play area attached to the school.

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New Goddard School in Carol Stream Now Open

Friday, February 1st, 2019

The Goddard School Carol Stream

After teaching in private and public schools for more than 10 years, Martin and Majlinda Gjini, franchisees of The Goddard School of Carol Stream, decided to open a school of their own.

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teacher at table instructing two young girls

A new Goddard School will be opening in Kennesaw Farms, TN.

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Table with papers on Marketing Strategy

To be a leader is to be a creator. Whether you’re a builder of timelines, a maker of company of culture or a designer of operations, leadership requires vision. You have to inspire others to do the work.

This year, I had the pleasure of interviewing so many incredible creative women from all over the globe, from actress and creative entrepreneur Karyn Parsons to music video director Hannah Lux Davis. And with every interview, I heard stories of resilience—lessons in brave creative leadership, resourceful decision-making and bold ambition.

So, as we head into 2019, I’d like to share the five key lessons I gleaned from the 51 pieces I wrote on creative entrepreneurship in 2018. I hope you learn just as much from these five entrepreneurs as I did.

1.) Show up and set the tone.

When you’re leading a team or self-employed, it’s on you to show up for your staff and for yourself. You have to push through moments of disappointment and doubt. You must show up and do the work. “On a daily basis, as an artist—or generally people who are creative-inclined—we’re just self-critical. There are times when everyday feels like a failure. There are times when I go to the studio and I am just sitting there and everything feels wrong. Or I feel like my career is falling apart and I don’t know what’s going to happen tomorrow. At some level, there’s a part of you that has to treat it like a job. You have to go in and you have to sit there and you’re going to stare at your work even if you don’t make it. You have to work through it. You can’t stop. You can’t give up. My grand theory is that if you don’t give up, you can’t fail,” artist and painter Hiba Schahbaz said.

2.) Invest in your operations. Invest in your team.

In order to establish a solid company culture, you must understand your business’ values and you must have the capacity to articulate these values to others. So, don’t skimp on the foundation of your business. Take time on your mission, your goals and your team. “My personal leadership style is to invest in really great, well-matched team members, give them the tools to do their job and then the freedom to be creative with their own approach while offering support when needed,” Meg Erskine, CEO and co-founder of Open Arms Studio said.

3.) Stay focused and lean.

When you’re running your own business, it can be easy to compare your entrepreneurial journey to others. And when we compare, we oftentimes go after milestones or symbols that have nothing to do with our company’s actual success. So, stay focused. “Keep your overhead low and diversify your income streams. There may be pressures to live beyond your means–wait on all that. Until you are making passive income, have steady funds for three years or more, or you win the lottery, keep that overhead low. Any extra income should be saved or invested,” DJ and creative entrepreneur Jasmine Solano said.

4.) Create the business you’d like to see in the world.

When you feel like giving up, remember why you started. As an entrepreneur, you have the ability to create something new for yourself and your team everyday. Take advantage of that privilege. “Our gut feelings are actually a really big part of how we operate. We’re discerning in the kinds of projects we take on board and which collaborators we decide to work with, but we tend to know when a thing feels right and when it works for us and we try not to overthink it. We move forward and we take action. In terms of starting this company, as well, we all had a desire to rethink the corporate structure we operate within in the film industry. Sure, you can sit in an office from nine to five or nine to ten, but you can also work from home one day. There are many different ways to work, and for us it is really about that, the work. It’s about getting the job done, and making sure that everyone who works with us and everyone who works at the company is happy and has a healthy work-life balance,” film producer and co-founder of Nowhere Studio, Maria Kongsved, said.

5.) Remember—your future, or your company’s future, is not limited by the scope of others’ opinions.

You will face rejection. You may not get the client you want, you might fail at a big project, or you may realize you need to change course. That’s part of the process. “I’m a badass woman and I am a good artist. I’m not going to let someone who doesn’t make art define my art. What artists share with the public is a reflection of our true selves. And everybody doesn’t like everybody in real life, and it needs to be looked at that way. Just because you don’t get the gig you want, it just might mean that gig is not for you. And every time I forget that, the universe just hits me with someone better than the thing I wanted so badly,” singer-songwriter and lead singer of The Suffers said.

 

This article was written by Jane Claire Hervey from Forbes and was legally licensed through the NewsCred publisher network. Please direct all licensing questions to legal@newscred.com.

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The Rastelli Brothers in front of The Goddard School

After spending 10 years as a member of the Round Rock community, educating young children, Ryan Rastelli, owner of The Goddard School in Round Rock, felt it was time to extend The Goddard School’s philosophy’s reach to Austin (Avery Ranch), TX.

Read more of the story here>>>>

4 Ways To Get The Most Out Of Your Employees

Thursday, January 10th, 2019

Group of co-workers celebrating in meeting room

The greatest investment companies can make is in their people. 

As the older generation departs and the new era of workers take over, companies are struggling to adapt to the reduced tenure an employee has with a company. The typical baby boomer stayed with a company for an average of 20-years while the new generation only stays for around two. 

The idea of working for one employer until retirement is non-existent in today’s workplace. According to the Bureau of Labor Statistics, the new generation of workers holds an average of 11.7 jobs with 27% of people changing jobs every year giving them the chronic job hopper title. 

Job hopping is defined as spending two years in a position before seeking out another position, typically for a higher salary or a better cultural fit. Companies are failing to accept the new job hopper mentality preventing them from getting the most out of their current talent. Instead of focusing on keeping current talent they’re investing more in recruiting new people to keep up with turnover.

According to a report published by the Society of Human Resource Management, companies spend an average of $4,426 per candidate with more than 50% of turnover happening in the new hires first year of employment. Companies lose $11 billion every year due to turnover because they’re neglecting current talent and focusing on attracting new.

Here are four ways companies can get the most out of their current talent

Cultivating Open Communication With Clear Expectations

Setting expectations doesn’t solely revolve around the goals of the actual position but also expands to cultural expectations, understanding the hierarchy and the contribution to an overall purpose.

Flattening the layers of the hierarchy and eliminating the micromanagement associated with them increases involvement and performance. Phil Shawe, CEO of TransPerfect, has found “when employees feel connected to the company and their management, they’re naturally more loyal.” He said, ”fostering a close-knit management team tends to inspire people to always consider the big picture and the overall well-being of the company when approaching business decisions.”

Keith R. Sbiral, a certified professional coach with Apochromatik says “open communication is a key component of a driven team.” Keeping employees involved in projects and processes keeps them motivated while increasing trust. Setting clear and specific expectations is one of the most impactful things managers can do for their employees.

Promoting Entrepreneurial Mindsets

Many companies are resistant to nurturing an entrepreneurial mindset in their employees for fear they’ll lose top talent. The reality is, a true entrepreneur is going to leave a company regardless how great their position is. Companies who aren’t afraid to let their employees leave show their current team they value their growth and development.

Hult International Business School describes an entrepreneurial mindset as “people with an appetite to do things differently and a talent for coming up with fresh ideas.” Employees that are given the freedom to think outside of the box are more innovative in finding more efficient ways of doing typical tasks.

Susana Yee of Digital Everything Consulting hires people who are hungry to create, grow and learn. She coaches them to better understand their thought process to solutions. After discussing possible solutions, she gives them “as much freedom as they want to solve those problems” empowering them to achieve more than they thought possible.

Fiona Adler, Founder of Actioned, fosters an entrepreneurial mindset through ownership and accountability. She created a system using a shared spreadsheet where everyone writes out their top actions for the day. As each person completes their top actions they cross them off keeping everyone updated on their own tasks. This helps to show how each person is contributing to the project. Every team member is held accountable for their daily tasks making them more deliberate about what they’re going to do for the day.

Investing in Their Development

A business is only as strong as their weakest employee. Gallup found that 87% of the new generation values professional career growth and development opportunities, yet 74% don’t feel they’re reaching their full potential.

When employees feel valued their loyalty increases reducing the overall turnover. This doesn’t always require financial output, it can be as simple as opening lines of communication, increasing responsibility and defining their journey throughout the organization.

Matt Ross, Co-founder and COO of RIZKNOWS and The Slumber Yard believes the best investment is empowering his employees by letting them take control over a project, campaign or department. Since taking a step back from directing his employees on how to do certain aspects of their job, Ross quickly realized his employees “want to feel like they’re making an impact on the business instead of just taking and executing orders.”

Driving Growth With Gestures

Giving praise is a simple and powerful way to build a sustainable culture. A lack of recognition leads to a dying culture. Employees are no longer motivated by their paycheck alone but instead fueled by praise and incentives. Recognition comes in various forms and can be as simple as a thank you. The way a business recognizes employees is entirely dependent on the culture.

The founder of Accelerated Growth Marketing, Stacy Caprio, believes in treating her employees as “an actual person.” She does this by “asking them about their day as well as letting them know they are appreciated and thanking them when they do a good job.”

Adham Sbeih at Socotra Capital implemented a peer recognition program where employees acknowledge their peers when they do something that demonstrates the company core values. He calls it “a goodie.” It doesn’t just stop there, employees are then recognized in an email blast with a detailed explanation of what they did and how it aligns to the company core values with a $25 gift card.

Companies who invest in their employees can extend their tenure by years. Start by opening up communication and creating conversations about what they need and collaborate on creating an effective strategy.

 

This article was written by Heidi Lynne Kurter from Forbes and was legally licensed through the NewsCred publisher network. Please direct all licensing questions to legal@newscred.com.

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