Posts Tagged ‘Entrepreneur’

The Goddard School at night

For the first time, The Goddard School®, a recognized leader in early childhood development and care, has opened a location in Meridian, ID.

Goddard Systems, Inc., franchisor of The Goddard School, recently announced the opening of the newest early childhood education facility located at 2009 S. Wells Ave., Meridian, in the Treasure Valley area.

The Goddard School located in Meridian officially opened its doors on Oct. 14 and is now enrolling children ages six weeks to six years old.

The Goddard School is the recognized leader in early childhood development and care, serving children from six weeks to six years. Its play-based educational philosophy, F.L.EX. (Fun Learning Experience) is accredited nationally by Cognia (formerly AdvancED) and the Middle States Association of Colleges and Schools.

“We aim to provide the best childhood preparation for social and academic success so that Idaho continues to thrive for generations to come,” said on-site owner Rick Antl.

The Godddard School groundbreaking Merididan

After sending his child to one of The Goddard Schools in Houston, he saw how much his son enjoyed it and grew as an individual.

“I have seen firsthand the difference a quality preschool can make in a child’s social and academic development and wanted to bring that to our community in Meridian,” said Antl. “I would like to help other parents to have that same experience.”

In his latest contribution to Forbes, Paul examines the role public relations plays in this new era of media.

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Exploring Your Franchise

Wednesday, January 16th, 2019

Joe Schumacher, CEO of Goddard Systems, Inc., explains what entrepreneurs should look for when exploring franchise opportunities.

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Effective Leaders Choose Humility Over Hubris

Thursday, December 27th, 2018

two people shaking hands with excited co-worker behind them

Hubris occurs when a person exhibits extreme pride or dangerous over-confidence. It often signals a loss of contact with reality. For business leaders, hubris represents the gross overestimation of one’s own professional competence, accomplishments and capabilities. The impact on the organization is severe. Subordinates are often mistreated and company performance can suffer.

In a previous article for the Forbes leadership channel, I wrote about the research documenting the high costs of workplace incivility in terms of dragging down the organization’s performance and poisoning its culture. Leaders tainted by hubris give life to toxic environments, workplaces where incivility, and downright hostility often flourish.

However, the reverse can also true. Leaders who choose humility, and who model humbleness in their actions, create the opposite kind of environment. This environment is grounded in respect, tolerance, and outcomes that are mutually beneficial for the firm and for the individual. Leaders who are good role models tend to radiate positivity, and instead of spawning a downward spiral, they create an upward spiral that elevates pro-social employee behaviors.

Given the power of ethical leaders, why is it, then, that these leaders seem to be in short supply? Part of it is how our brains are wired. Due to evolution, humans have a negativity bias in which we tend to pay attention to and remember negative information more readily than positive information.

Positive behavior can also capture our attention, if for no other reason that it stands out from workplace norms. Actions by ethical leaders are most powerful in negative or neutral contexts, which shape what employees pay attention to and model. The actions also provide a model for how we are expected to act and interact with others. Leaders, therefore, can have a significant impact depending on whether their behaviors provide positive or negative cues on what others should value and, in turn, emulate. Thus, hubris versus humility is a critical choice for every leader in every situation.

Several research studies by Christine Porath and her colleagues show that positive behaviors by leaders are correlated with pro-social employee outcomes. Behaviors that model workplace civility have a greater impact than any of the traditional approaches associated with increased employee satisfaction. This includes providing meaningful employee feedback, effectively communicating a vision, providing developmental opportunities and even offering pay raises and bonuses for top-performing employees. Leaders who model civility have workplaces with the highest levels of employee engagement, satisfaction and retention, according to Porath’s work. Thus, it is not just a matter of stopping workplace incivility; it is equally important for leaders to actively shape positive behaviors that reinforce and normalize positive workplace civility.

Another line of research, positive organizational scholarship (POS), focuses on the ways in which leaders can enhance individual and organizational outcomes by leading with positive prosocial behaviors and interactions as opposed to negative, destructive actions. Scholars in this area focus on personal strength, resiliency, restoration and forms of inclusive leadership that help to maximize human potential.

As described by Kim Cameron, one of the originators of POS, leadership practices should create a “culture of virtuous action” within organizations. While a wide variety of leadership behaviors are involved in shaping this type of culture, there are four primary actions undertaken by leaders that emerge. I label it as the CARE Model of Effective Leadership, with the acronym standing for communication, authenticity, respect and ethics.

  • Communication styles of effective leaders may differ in some respects but all engage in positive, productive and purposeful interpersonal interactions. Poor or divisive communication styles lead to high workplace conflict and erode trust in leadership. A leader’s style of communication should also include gratitude that values people, their talents and their contributions.
  • Authenticity involves what Laura Morgan-Roberts calls “bringing your whole self to work” as a critical step in the process of becoming extraordinary. Her work suggests that authenticity has become one of the highest virtues for effective leadership. A leader’s authenticity gives permission for employees to present all aspects of their identities at work in a safe environment.
  • Respect means treating others in an ethical and responsible manner. Effective leaders set standards for behavior and serve as role models based on their actions and not their words alone. Instances of unfair treatment, unconscious bias, unwarranted favoritism, conflicts of interest and acts of injustice violate the trust necessary for high levels of employee engagement and a positive workplace culture.
  • Ethics must go beyond a written code and be modeled in the everyday behavior of the organization. This has value to the organization beyond the avoidance of costly litigation or a negative reputation. When ethical rules or the norms of justice and fairness are broken by a leader, employees often become morally disengaged. That can cause unethical behavior to spread throughout the organization. Ethical roles models, in contrast, help to shape a workplace culture where being fair and trustworthy is contagious.

Humility over hubris is a clear choice for leaders who understand that there is substantial evidence for the impact of positive role modeling for producing effective organizational outcomes. Effective leaders should consistently strive to maintain the principles of the CARE Model. This approach creates a type of affirmative bias that focuses on the abundance of people’s strengths rather than on their weaknesses, and proactively leverages opportunities rather than avoiding or assigning blame for threats or failures.

Humility over hubris also recognizes that organizational effectiveness is not solely based on the leader; it is focused, too, on the development, health and well-being of those being led. Every choice and decision by a leader should involve being a positive role model of the four key components within the CARE Model.

The choice for a leader is clear. Choose humility.

 

This article was written by Audrey Murrell from Forbes and was legally licensed through the NewsCred publisher network. Please direct all licensing questions to legal@newscred.com.

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In his latest contribution to Forbes, Paul Koulogeorge, VP of Marketing, Advertising and Public Relations for Goddard Systems, Inc., explains how the company overhauled its corporate communications and offers insight and advice on how other leaders can benefit from improving the way they communicate.

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Last week, I hopped on a video conference with a client, and the first thing he said to me was that I looked tired. As a career consultant, that’s never the first thing you want to hear from a client you’re supposed to be motivating and energizing. I actually was exhausted after a couple long nights with our 11-month old struggling to sleep with her cold.

However, it reminded me that when you’re the face of your business, there often isn’t room for you to look tired, even when you are. Your business’s survival and growth depends on your ability to show up at every single client engagement full of energy and enthusiasm so you can not only get the job done but also give your clients the confidence to know you can get the job done.

Being self-employed involves more than just building a business from scratch, bringing in clients, and delivering a useful service or product. It involves maintaining a positive mindset and firm belief that you absolutely will succeed so you can always bring your A-game to everything you do.

While running my own business has been incredibly rewarding, and I wouldn’t trade it for a stable full-time corporate job like the one I used to have, self-employment has also been the most challenging professional endeavor of my life. Building my own personal brand, managing all aspects of my business, and figuring so many things out on my own without any sort of roadmap to guide me can be exhausting, both physically and emotionally.

Unsurprisingly, the majority of small businesses don’t survive beyond the first few years, a statistic that always looms in the back of my mind. So here are two principles I’ve kept in mind that have helped me stay productive during the more challenging parts of my own journey when I felt like stepping off the gas.

Don’t Celebrate Too Soon

Woman with outstretched arms overlooking a mountain cliff

Last year, I was invited to be a presentation skills trainer at the European headquarters of a large corporation. After a few discussions over the phone, I eventually traveled to meet the team in person, and after my initial pitch presentation, they seemed impressed. They even went on to ask me whether I could share a proposal to roll out my public speaking workshops to several more of their offices in Europe. They agreed to my fees, and we even booked tentative dates. Everything looked promising.

When I was confirming final details, I literally never heard from them again.

The workshops never happened. The opportunity fizzled out. Just like that. To this day, I still have no idea why. 

I can’t tell you how many times I’ve had a big opportunity come up, just to have it fall through later. Or to get excited about a new collaboration, only to later find out about some catch. Or to feel like I’ve finally found the perfect person or team to hire, only to later realize it wasn’t meant to be. 

These days, I make a point not to celebrate too soon. I, of course, remain committed and engaged through to the end, but I try to detach myself from an assumed outcome to avoid a bigger let down in case things don’t work out. This mentality also forces me to ensure I’m still working hard to earn business, create other content, or nurture other client relationships so I’m not dependent on any single engagement necessarily proceeding.

Remember That Seeds Can Sprout At Any Time

 

Small seedling growing in sand with shadow

 

When I look out into the sea of independent business owners and solopreneurs, it’s hard not to notice those who have built a huge following or achieved enormous growth, especially because these exact people tend to be the ones featured in the popular press.

On the other hand, having run my own business now for five years, although it’s grown steadily, I’ve never felt like I’ve achieved a similar level of explosive growth. When I put out my first podcast episodes, I had hundreds of listeners, not thousands. When I posted my first career change videos and blog posts online, I got a handful of views, not millions. 

I sometimes wonder if my efforts will eventually bear some real fruit.

Sometimes they do, but sometimes, they don’t. So I just try to remind myself that you just never know when the seeds you plant will finally sprout.

I’ve had former colleagues whom I worked with over a decade ago become clients. I’ve had videos I posted online years ago lead to a big keynote speaking opportunity. I’ve had article pitches initially fall on deaf ears, but eventually get published months, even years later.

You just really never know when you will turn a corner. Keeping this in mind can help you keep going when you feel like throwing in the towel.

Maintaining A Positive Mindset Is Critical To Growth

Man working with tools

I’ve had plenty of times when I didn’t gain the traction I wanted to after a ton of work. Remembering that business ownership is indeed challenging and doing my best to be persistent during these inevitable moments of frustration has helped me stay on track and remain in the game through the tough times.

I certainly don’t have it all figured out, but five years in, my business continues to expand, my work remains incredibly fulfilling, and I can’t imagine walking away from this dynamic, rewarding ride as a self-employed business owner anytime soon.

 

This article was written by Joseph Liu from Forbes and was legally licensed through the NewsCred publisher network. Please direct all licensing questions to legal@newscred.com.

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When you become an entrepreneur, TGIF may not hold the same meaning it once had when you had a 9-5. Many business owners find themselves working weekends in order to keep up or get ahead.

Running a business can be rewarding but also stressful and time-consuming especially if you have a lot of responsibilities on your plate. I’ll admit, I used to use weekends to keep my business afloat by catching up on assignments and working on side projects that were on my long to-do list.

Working every day can lead to serious burnout after a while. Plus, if you are your own boss you should be able to enjoy the freedom or setting your own scheduling and taking time off to relax and refuel.

Here are a few things you can do to manage your time better manage your time and workload so you can add more freedom and flexibility to your weekends.

Wake Up 1 Hour Earlier During the Week

It’s no secret that waking up earlier can do wonders for your productivity. Simply said, it’s a sure way to have more time in the day to get stuff done.

You can kick off your morning routine earlier and be ready to crank out work by the time you would normally just be waking up. If you want to work fewer hours over the weekend, this is one of the best solutions to try although it may not be easiest at first.

If you get up one hour early Monday – Friday, you’ll be adding 5 hours back into your work week. This will likely make you less stressed and overwhelmed by the time Friday afternoon rolls around.

Adjust Your Daily Schedule

Your to-do list isn’t a schedule. It’s simply a list of stuff you have to get done. You create a schedule when you organize those tasks effectively. Smart business owners create clear and realistic schedules to follow each day. If you’re looking to add more freedom and flexibility to your weekends, you’ll likely need to adjust your schedule to accommodate that. This often means becoming more efficient so more gets accomplished during the week.

Determine how much time you have to work on your business during the week and what amount of limited hours you’d like to put in on weekends if any. Then, consider block scheduling tasks or knocking out the most mentally challenging tasks on your list during the work week.

If you only have to do something small like social media posts or sending follow-ups for an hour on Saturday morning, it probably won’t really ruin your entire weekend and you’ll still have the freedom to take a step back from your business.

Start Being Unavailable For Business Tasks During the Weekend

Have better control over your calendar and set expectations with customers and clients that your availability will be limited during weekends. This way, no one is expecting you to respond to their email they sent on Friday or Sunday afternoon.

I always set my calendar as unavailable during weekends and specific days. You would think most people wouldn’t be doing business on those weekends anyway but you’d be surprised. I try not to agree to specific deadlines for tasks that fall on weekend days either because it’s better that I don’t have anything business-related scheduled and can just work if and when I please.

One of the most common reasons why business owners end up working and adhering to strict schedules on weekends is because they fail to determine a stop time for their work. It’s great to love what you do but working and sticking to a schedule 24/7 won’t help you out as much as you think in the long run.

It’s important to dedicate time to unplug and scale back especially if you have an online business as it’s often so easy to just log on and start working anywhere and at any time.

Theme Your Weekends

You’re likely reading this because you want to have more freedom and flexibility to do what you want to do on weekends instead of just tending to your business. Creating a loose theme around what you truly want to do during weekends can help seal the deal.

Just like you set goals for your business and create themes, theme your weekend based on what you truly want to spend your time doing whether that’s spending time with family, catching up with friends, taking day trips etc. It’s simple to do but it really works.

Sometimes, any free time we have can get spent doing unproductive work that doesn’t add any value to our lives. Just like you want to schedule important meetings and deadlines, schedule family days or time to read or plan. Establishing a loose theme will provide direction but also leave you with the freedom and flexibility to divvy up your time.

Weekends can fly by quickly and if you don’t manage your time and priorities well during the week, you’ll pay for it during the time when you truly want to relax and unplug.

The best thing an entrepreneur can do is put themselves on a schedule and set boundaries. Having a schedule doesn’t mean being glued to work 24/7. You should be sure to schedule in downtime and theme your weekends so you don’t let the opportunity to create memorable moments outside of work pass you by.

How do you create more freedom and flexibility during weekends?

This article originally appeared in Calendar.

 

This article was written by Choncé Maddox from Business2Community and was legally licensed through the NewsCred publisher network. Please direct all licensing questions to legal@newscred.com.

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Bad Business Habits You Need To Stop

Wednesday, May 30th, 2018

Woman reading notes and drinking coffee at café

Getting into bad business habits will hold you back and stop you from growing your business. We all have bad habits and it’s not just limited to things like biting your nails or smoking. We also have bad business habits. Here are 5 that you need to stop now so that you can grow your business:

Lack Of Planning

As I talked about in last weeks post about Social Media Marketing Mistakes, you need a plan. Whether it’s for your marketing or your overall business, you need some sort of plan otherwise you’re driving blind and don’t know where you are going. Some people seem to get by in business just completely winging it. This is the exception to the rule. In general, you need a plan and you need to stick to it.

Thinking It’s All About You

Even though you are your business and there may be nobody else involved in it, it’s not all about you. Actually, it’s nothing to do with you. If you are constantly thinking about your own wants and needs and doing everything to suit yourself in your business, then you are very quickly going to form some very bad business habits. Your business isn’t about you. It’s about the people you serve. Your audience, your customers. It is about their wants and needs so make sure you are putting them first.

No ROI

There are lots of marketing and social media activities you could be doing in your business but you need to do them with a clear ROI (return on investment). If you are doing lots of things but don’t really have a clear goal for what you want to achieve from them, you may be wasting your time and forming more bad business habits.

If it’s a case of you need to set the goal so that you can have a clear ROI then you may find my goal setting worksheets useful to plan out your goals.

Not Listening

So often people ask for help with specific tasks in their business but then don’t listen. They ask the expert but then think they know better. Nobody knows your business better than you but likewise, nobody knows marketing/accounting/legal stuff better than the person who does that stuff day in day out. So many times I have had businesses come to me because they are struggling with their social media. I come up with a plan for them but they still go off and do it their way. The way that wasn’t working in the first place. Listen to others when you seek help. But listen to the right people. You wouldn’t take financial advice from your butcher.

Similarly, listen to your customers. Listen to their feedback, their wants and needs. You can’t serve them if you don’t first listen to them. Listen more than you speak.

You Can’t Do It All By Yourself

It would be great to think we can build these amazing businesses all by ourselves without any outside help. But the truth is you can’t do it all. You can’t be chief floor sweeper and chief marketing officer. Sometimes you need to outsource or ask for help. Try to offload and outsource as much as you possibly can. Even if it’s small tasks in your personal life, like getting your shopping delivered, do things to free up your time and save your stress.

Even if you can’t afford to outsource tasks to, find others you can talk to about your issues or things you need help with. Sharing is caring and someone else may know the perfect solution to your dilemma.

This article originally appeared in Socially Sam.

 

This article was written by Samantha Martin from Business2Community and was legally licensed through the NewsCred publisher network. Please direct all licensing questions to legal@newscred.com.

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Nothing kills a vacation faster than obsessing about the work you left behind. Next time you’re OOO, try these real-world hacks for leaving the office at the office.

I used to be distracted with work for the first few days of every vacation because I don’t turn it off and on easily. Now I know that I have to have a system in place to release work thoughts. When I’m with my family, we bookend the trip with some kind of relaxing activity. We might sleep in on the first and last days, at a minimum. We don’t schedule anything. That helps me put away the work thoughts and transition into relaxing. Being intentional about the transition is so important to me. — Jennifer Kem, 44, CEO of Branding Agency Kemcomm in Honolulu

One goal I have when I vacation is to stop multitasking and just focus on a single thing at a time. I use the vacation to experiment with letting go of the world I’ve created for myself and escaping my routine. I also like to think about what I want to get out of the time. Ask yourself, “What kind of vacation is this? Is this one for the kids? Is it a retreat for me? Is it for R & R, to get away?” Knowing the answer creates a purpose for my vacation. — Marsha Nunley, 68, Physician Specializing in Bioidentical Hormones and Healthy Aging in San Francisco and Austin, Texas

Before I go on vacation, I write out what my intentions are for the trip. I might write down, “I desire this to be a really rejuvenating time” or “I hope to have ease during my check-in and flight.” I meditate on those intentions and put them on an altar in my house, which I use as a place for all the things I want to come to fruition. I also take crystals and stones with me on vacation: rose quartz for love, citrine for happy energy, and carnelian because it’s grounding. Anytime little things happen on vacation that might agitate me, I take out my crystals and hold them to help me stay in my restful state. — Jo-ná Williams, 37, Intellectual Property and Business Attorney in New York City

Last year my wife and I went on a trip to Costa Rica. We bought plane tickets six months in advance and took Spanish classes at a local college to prepare. Since we’d been looking forward to the trip for so long, it was easier to not let myself work while we were away. I didn’t want to spoil all the anticipation we’d had by working. Planning everything so far in advance also helped us make the best use of our time and really made the trip feel special. My first day back at work, I set aside some time to catch up on everything. — Jon Busdeker, 35, Freelance Videographer and Nonprofit Group Leader in Orlando, Florida

We schedule our work and phone time so our family time doesn’t revolve around it on vacation. I make sure I schedule about an hour of phone and computer time each day and like to do it first thing so it’s out of the way. I feel better knowing the sky isn’t falling back at work. We also have a family agreement that when we sit down for a meal, there is a no-phone rule. My children fought this rule for a while, but now they put their stuff away and we just enjoy our time together. It’s such a stress reliever. — Sunny Hostin, 49, Cohost of the View and Senior Legal Correspondent for ABC News in New York City

 

This article was written by Jane Porter from Real Simple and was legally licensed through the NewsCred publisher network. Please direct all licensing questions to legal@newscred.com.

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Joe Schumacher

Joe Shumacher, CEO of Goddard Systems, Inc. shares five wisdom nuggets on Thrive Global.

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