Archive for the ‘Goddard Systems’ Category

Group of co-workers around table laughing in meeting

Trust is often cited by relationship experts as the key to a long-lasting and successful union. But trust is also an essential ingredient in your workplace relationships, impacting employee satisfaction, retention, and even productivity.

In a 2016 global CEO survey, 55% of CEOs said a lack of trust poses a threat to the ability of their organization to grow. And, a recent study published in Harvard Business Review shows they are right.According to the study, people working in high-trust companies reported 74% less stress than those working in low-trust companies. They also report 106% more energy at work, 13% fewer sick days, 76% more engagement, 29% more satisfaction with their lives, and 40% less burnout. All of these factors fuel stronger performance. Trust, it seems, is at the core of a strong company culture.

Jeff Yurcisin, president of Zulily, agrees. He argues trust is critical to Zulily’s success. As a fast-paced company, Zulily encourages employees to feel empowered to take ownership of their work. However, Yurcisin says this empowerment doesn’t happen if trust does not exist among colleagues and between employees and their managers.

So, how can you build a culture of trust in your workplace?

Foster Open Communication

“The best thing any leader can do to earn trust is facilitate transparency,” says Yurcisin. In addition to all managers having an open-door policy to encourage communication within their teams, Zulily also hosts bi-weekly company-wide meetings, allowing for open communication among the entire staff of 3,500 people in real time.

During these meetings, Zulily shares news with all employees, addresses concerns, and ensures everyone is aligned to the company’s goals and mission. “While we also rely on emails, newsletters and a company intranet, we believe in the interpersonal communication channels,” says Yurcisin. This transparency helps to build a culture of trust among employees and the leadership team.

Show a Clear Path

According to the Harvard Business Review, only 40% of employees report being well informed about their company’s goals. Uncertainty about the direction the company is taking or inconsistency in messages leads to chronic stress among employees and erodes feelings of trust between employees and the management team.

Ensuring employees are clear about the company’s goals including where the company is going and how they will get there leads to a more engaged workforce that is unified around a shared purpose and helps to build trust within the company.

This doesn’t mean you have to have all the answers. “When it comes to instilling trust between managers and employees, what’s most important is first establishing a shared mission. A clear goal,” says Yuricisn. Leaders may not have all the answers, and that’s okay. Being honest about the things you don’t know can actually help to establish your credibility.

Recognize Your Talent

According to the Harvard Business Review, recognition has a large impact on trustworthiness.

Yurcisin says Zulily attempts to ensure that every employee in each department is celebrated, both at an individual level within their departments, and through all-company communications. This recognition helps to ensure that employees don’t just feel like another number.

“Though it’s tempting in today’s data-driven culture to reduce people to mere data, what engages people is human connection, and that’s done by sharing each other’s stories,” says Yurcisin. By telling these success stories and highlighting the work that’s being done across the company–from the accounts payable team to the logistics team–you can earn trust and align staff to the broader mission of the company by demonstrating these important contributions to the company’s shared goals.

Allow for Failure

Imagine working in an environment where you are too afraid to try something new because failing may mean you’ll be issued a pink slip.

Yurcisin says Zulily has adopted a policy of embracing failure, even adding some humor to mistakes. He speaks of the website’s tech team, who have a small pig figurine that gets passed around to engineers who crash the site. “It’s our way of celebrating failure,” says Yurcisin. “That mistake is a way for our team to learn what works and what doesn’t,” he says. Allowing your team to learn through failure instills trust that enables that creativity and ingenuity to happen.

Keep Your Word

Trust is not built overnight, or in a single meeting, but is something that is established over time through every interaction an employee has with another team member. Encourage everyone in the company to stay true to their word. If you schedule a meeting with someone, make sure you show up. If you say you’ll get something done, do it. Building a culture of trust begins with these small acts.

Get Personal

Leaders can foster a culture of trust by encouraging employees to be open and honest about their professional goals. Encouraging an open and candid conversation about employees’ career paths and opportunities, listening to each team member, and understanding them on a human level is critical to building trust.

 

This article was written by Lisa Evans from Fast Company and was legally licensed through the NewsCred publisher network. Please direct all licensing questions to legal@newscred.com.

Blank Black Image

long-hill-twp-opening

Sumara and Imran Ahmad, owners of the newest Goddard School located in Long Hill, NJ, are one step closer to fulfilling their dream of opening a preschool.

CLICK HERE TO READ MORE>>>>

Effective Leaders Choose Humility Over Hubris

Thursday, December 27th, 2018

two people shaking hands with excited co-worker behind them

Hubris occurs when a person exhibits extreme pride or dangerous over-confidence. It often signals a loss of contact with reality. For business leaders, hubris represents the gross overestimation of one’s own professional competence, accomplishments and capabilities. The impact on the organization is severe. Subordinates are often mistreated and company performance can suffer.

In a previous article for the Forbes leadership channel, I wrote about the research documenting the high costs of workplace incivility in terms of dragging down the organization’s performance and poisoning its culture. Leaders tainted by hubris give life to toxic environments, workplaces where incivility, and downright hostility often flourish.

However, the reverse can also true. Leaders who choose humility, and who model humbleness in their actions, create the opposite kind of environment. This environment is grounded in respect, tolerance, and outcomes that are mutually beneficial for the firm and for the individual. Leaders who are good role models tend to radiate positivity, and instead of spawning a downward spiral, they create an upward spiral that elevates pro-social employee behaviors.

Given the power of ethical leaders, why is it, then, that these leaders seem to be in short supply? Part of it is how our brains are wired. Due to evolution, humans have a negativity bias in which we tend to pay attention to and remember negative information more readily than positive information.

Positive behavior can also capture our attention, if for no other reason that it stands out from workplace norms. Actions by ethical leaders are most powerful in negative or neutral contexts, which shape what employees pay attention to and model. The actions also provide a model for how we are expected to act and interact with others. Leaders, therefore, can have a significant impact depending on whether their behaviors provide positive or negative cues on what others should value and, in turn, emulate. Thus, hubris versus humility is a critical choice for every leader in every situation.

Several research studies by Christine Porath and her colleagues show that positive behaviors by leaders are correlated with pro-social employee outcomes. Behaviors that model workplace civility have a greater impact than any of the traditional approaches associated with increased employee satisfaction. This includes providing meaningful employee feedback, effectively communicating a vision, providing developmental opportunities and even offering pay raises and bonuses for top-performing employees. Leaders who model civility have workplaces with the highest levels of employee engagement, satisfaction and retention, according to Porath’s work. Thus, it is not just a matter of stopping workplace incivility; it is equally important for leaders to actively shape positive behaviors that reinforce and normalize positive workplace civility.

Another line of research, positive organizational scholarship (POS), focuses on the ways in which leaders can enhance individual and organizational outcomes by leading with positive prosocial behaviors and interactions as opposed to negative, destructive actions. Scholars in this area focus on personal strength, resiliency, restoration and forms of inclusive leadership that help to maximize human potential.

As described by Kim Cameron, one of the originators of POS, leadership practices should create a “culture of virtuous action” within organizations. While a wide variety of leadership behaviors are involved in shaping this type of culture, there are four primary actions undertaken by leaders that emerge. I label it as the CARE Model of Effective Leadership, with the acronym standing for communication, authenticity, respect and ethics.

  • Communication styles of effective leaders may differ in some respects but all engage in positive, productive and purposeful interpersonal interactions. Poor or divisive communication styles lead to high workplace conflict and erode trust in leadership. A leader’s style of communication should also include gratitude that values people, their talents and their contributions.
  • Authenticity involves what Laura Morgan-Roberts calls “bringing your whole self to work” as a critical step in the process of becoming extraordinary. Her work suggests that authenticity has become one of the highest virtues for effective leadership. A leader’s authenticity gives permission for employees to present all aspects of their identities at work in a safe environment.
  • Respect means treating others in an ethical and responsible manner. Effective leaders set standards for behavior and serve as role models based on their actions and not their words alone. Instances of unfair treatment, unconscious bias, unwarranted favoritism, conflicts of interest and acts of injustice violate the trust necessary for high levels of employee engagement and a positive workplace culture.
  • Ethics must go beyond a written code and be modeled in the everyday behavior of the organization. This has value to the organization beyond the avoidance of costly litigation or a negative reputation. When ethical rules or the norms of justice and fairness are broken by a leader, employees often become morally disengaged. That can cause unethical behavior to spread throughout the organization. Ethical roles models, in contrast, help to shape a workplace culture where being fair and trustworthy is contagious.

Humility over hubris is a clear choice for leaders who understand that there is substantial evidence for the impact of positive role modeling for producing effective organizational outcomes. Effective leaders should consistently strive to maintain the principles of the CARE Model. This approach creates a type of affirmative bias that focuses on the abundance of people’s strengths rather than on their weaknesses, and proactively leverages opportunities rather than avoiding or assigning blame for threats or failures.

Humility over hubris also recognizes that organizational effectiveness is not solely based on the leader; it is focused, too, on the development, health and well-being of those being led. Every choice and decision by a leader should involve being a positive role model of the four key components within the CARE Model.

The choice for a leader is clear. Choose humility.

 

This article was written by Audrey Murrell from Forbes and was legally licensed through the NewsCred publisher network. Please direct all licensing questions to legal@newscred.com.

Blank Black Image

Man smiling during conversation

If you run a small business, you probably have become accustomed to working hard….really hard. Seven-days-a-week hard, with nary a day off. Admirable, but also dangerous, because you risk burnout, health problems, and grumbling employees. It’s up to you to create a healthier work-life balance, so here are five tips to get you started:

Shorten your workweek:

Nowadays, many business owners feel guilty if they work less than 10 hours a day, including weekends. This is sure to exhaust your mind and hamper your creativity. If you want to increase your productivity, shorten your workweek. Put in no more than 40 per week and try to not work on weekends. Remember, sitting at your desk for long hours doesn’t equate to productivity. Work the hours you actually need to and relax the rest of the time.

Use technology:

We live in the high-tech era, so let technology do some of the heavy lifting for you. Automate your workday with a suite of apps that collect, process and distribute information. AI apps can automatically generate your Twitter tweets, schedule your appointments and alert you to important news. Update your old apps – email campaigns are much more sophisticated than they were five years ago, so use a modern app to manage your email marketing.

Enter the cloud:

Are your data and apps still residing on a hard disk on your computer? That’s a shame because migrating to the cloud opens up all sorts of possibilities that can make you more productive and save you time. Look at apps like accounting, CRM, design, and development. They need to share data to operate most efficiently. By putting your databases on the cloud, you can take advantage of scalable software that is constantly updated and doesn’t take up valuable real estate on your computer.

Take a vacation:

If you feel you are indispensable all the time, you’ll never get any time off. You deserve a vacation, and two weeks of sun and fun will do wonders for helping you get through the remaining 50. Pick your least busy time of year, and either close up shop or assign tasks to employees you can trust. Maybe two weeks is out of reach right now, but try to get at least three or four days in a block, and build from there.

Stop fretting about money:

Many small businesses have variable cash flows that sometimes leaves them cash-starved. This constant worry will drain all the joy out of being a business owner. The solution is to create a relationship with a trustworthy business lender, like IOU Financial. You can borrow and pay back quickly on convenient terms, with never a pre-payment penalty. Daily or weekly payments mean no large monthly lump-sum repayments to worry about. And with loans up to $300,000, we can give you peace of mind for just about any circumstance.

You started your own business to make money, be your own boss and do things the way you want. But wasn’t the ultimate goal to achieve a happy life? Don’t wait until it’s too late – add some joy to your life right now. Adopt our five tips, plus ones you come across in other articles. If you work with a team, what better way to demonstrate the value you place on work-life balance than to practice it yourself? Protect yourself from burnout now, and you’re more likely to happily remain in business over the long run.

This article originally appeared in IOU Financial.

 

This article was written by Kaitlyn Hammond from Business2Community and was legally licensed through the NewsCred publisher network. Please direct all licensing questions to legal@newscred.com.

Blank Black image

Central Pa. Goddard School Will Expand

Tuesday, December 18th, 2018

Construction crew kicking off The Goddard School York, PA expansion

The Goddard School located in York, PA is expanding. The new facility will be similar to the current building but will also include an indoor play space, outdoor STEAM (science, technology, engineering, arts and mathematics) and music classrooms, a faculty lounge and a kindergarten classroom.

CLICK HERE TO READ MORE>>>>

Goddard School Opening in Westport

Tuesday, December 11th, 2018

Coming soon photo for The Goddard School Westport

The Goddard School of Westport, CT is anticipated to open in the summer of 2019.

CLICK HERE TO READ MORE>>>>

two people in meeting

In his latest contribution to Forbes, Paul Koulogeorge, VP of Marketing, Advertising and Public Relations for Goddard Systems, Inc., explains how the company overhauled its corporate communications and offers insight and advice on how other leaders can benefit from improving the way they communicate.

CLICK HERE TO READ MORE>>>>

Sheetal Patel is the onsite owner of the newest Goddard School opening up in Pearland, TX.

CLICK HERE TO READ MORE >>>>

Goddard 30 year anniversary convention logo width=

Goddard Systems, Inc.’s (GSI), the franchisor of The Goddard School, annual franchisee convention was held in Nassau, Bahamas. Recipients of its yearly awards were announced to honor model franchisees who contribute to their communities through service-based projects and provide high-quality childcare with leading health and safety practices.

Goddard School franchisees attend the convention because they know it is essential to running a successful business.

“Ideas generated in workshops and time spent with fellow owners keep you up on latest trends and changes in the industry/business. Networking is paramount at these events and provides so much connection amongst GSI and Franchisees,” said Barbra Bryan from Mooresville, NC.

GSI is proud to present the 2018 convention award categories and winners:

Brand Ambassador Award

·         Vince and Nancy Radosta, Castle Rock, CO

Humanitarian Award

·         Leisa Byars, Hendersonville, TN

·         Anthony and Ada Vassallo, Norwood, NJ

Leadership Award

·         John Agaman, Sparks, NV

Philip Schumacher Award

·         Shauna and Jeff Barison, Redmond Ridge, WA

Rookie of the Year Award

·         Brooks Coatney, Fayetteville, AR

Circle of Excellence for Education Award

·         Dolly and Monty Kalsi, Bethlehem, PA

·         Mark and Wendy Reinhart, Anderson Township, OH

·         Mike and Janelle Glasser, Bare Hills, MD

·         Butch and Maria Aggen, Cedar Park, TX

·         Jim and Debbie Womack, Chesterfield, VA

·         Dina and Matt Speranza, Cranberry Township, PA

·         Amber and Dave O’Brien, Forest Hill, MD

·         Jim and Jill Worley, Gaithersburg, MD

·         Susan Hoy and Tim Hoy, Hillsborough, NJ

·         Michael Smithers, Ladera Ranch, CA

·         Kellie McDonald, Lake Orion, MI

·         Dipti Singh, Millersville, MD

·         Shauna and Jeff Barison, Redmond Ridge, WA

·         Ryan and Chelli Motherway, South Reno, NV

·         Denise Cross, Reno (Somersett), NV

·         Melanie and Bill Hyatt, Simpsonville, SC

·         Lissa Knox and Erin Goulet, Snohomish, WA

·         John, Jody and Kristen Agaman, Sparks, NV

·         Ted and Robin Ray, Sugar Hill, GA

·         David and Donna Raye, Third Lake, IL

·         Fran and Bryant Lubbs, Wayne, PA

Circle of Excellence for Operations Award

·         Olivia Teja and Kamal Desilva, Bellevue, WA

·         Angela Norman, Centerville, OH

·         Kate Joseph, Cincinnati, OH

·         Jim and Jill Worley, Gaithersburg, MD

·         Jyoti Verma, Henderson, NV

·         Kellie McDonald, Lake Orion, MI

·         Sheeba Mathew, Marriottsville, MD

·         Dipti Singh, Millersville, MD

·         Wendy Somers, Newtown, PA

·         Bob and Lori Santo, Peters Township, PA

·         Melanie and Bill Hyatt, Simpsonville, SC

·         Pete Joseph, South Lebanon, OH

·         John, Jody and Kristen Agaman, Sparks, NV

·         Ted and Robin Ray, Sugar Hill, GA

Circle of Excellence President’s Club Award

·         Jim and Jill Worley, Gaithersburg, MD

·         Kellie McDonald, Lake Orion, MI

·         Dipti Singh, Millersville, MD

·         Melanie and Bill Hyatt, Simpsonville, SC

·         John, Jodi and Kristen Agaman, Sparks, NV

·         Ted and Robin Ray, Sugar Hill, GA

Outstanding Market Award – Phoenix, AZ

·         Nicole and Matt Bigham and Beth and Vince Valentino, Buckeye (Verrado), AZ

·         Jake Thompson, Cave Creek, AZ

·         Todd and Christine Goldberg, Chandler, AZ

·         Van Phan, Gilbert (Higley), AZ

·         Penny Mekhanik, Gilbert (East Germann), AZ

·         Karen and Keith Latchaw, Gilbert (Warner), AZ

·         Natalia Elfimova, Scottsdale, AZ

·         JoEllen Johnson, Goodyear, AZ

Outstanding Customer Experience Award

·         Todd and Christine Goldberg, Chandler, AZ

Director of the Year Award

·         Stacey Molnar (director), Karyn Smykowski and Suzanne Hanf (owners), Toms River, NJ

Anthony A. Martino Scholarship Award

·         Sabreena Leach and Cindy Pyatt, Oakville, MO

 

“As proven by this year’s honorees, choosing to operate a School is more than just a good business decision,” said Joe Schumacher, CEO of GSI. “Our franchisees choose to make a profound impact on the lives of future generations.”

The Goddard School focuses on learning through play for children from six weeks to six years old. This year marks the system’s 30th anniversary in business. Learn more about franchising opportunities with The Goddard School at www.goddardschoolfranchise.com

Goddard School Opens in Woodbury

Friday, November 30th, 2018

The Goddard School Woodbury

Franchisee, Shannon Gehrmann and her husband fell in love with The Goddard School, located near their home in the Chicago suburbs when they were new parents. Now they have opened their own School located in Woodbury, MN.

CLICK HERE TO READ MORE >>>>