Archive for the ‘The Goddard School Franchise’ Category

After spending 10 years as a member of the Round Rock community, educating young children, Ryan Rastelli, owner of The Goddard School in Round Rock, felt it was time to extend The Goddard School’s philosophy’s reach to Austin (Avery Ranch), TX.

CLICK HERE TO SEE MORE>>>>

Exploring Your Franchise

Wednesday, January 16th, 2019

Joe Schumacher, CEO of Goddard Systems, Inc., explains what entrepreneurs should look for when exploring franchise opportunities.

CLICK HERE TO READ MORE>>>>

4 Ways To Get The Most Out Of Your Employees

Thursday, January 10th, 2019

1.10.19 Post.png

The greatest investment companies can make is in their people. 

As the older generation departs and the new era of workers take over, companies are struggling to adapt to the reduced tenure an employee has with a company. The typical baby boomer stayed with a company for an average of 20-years while the new generation only stays for around two. 

The idea of working for one employer until retirement is non-existent in today’s workplace. According to the Bureau of Labor Statistics, the new generation of workers holds an average of 11.7 jobs with 27% of people changing jobs every year giving them the chronic job hopper title. 

Job hopping is defined as spending two years in a position before seeking out another position, typically for a higher salary or a better cultural fit. Companies are failing to accept the new job hopper mentality preventing them from getting the most out of their current talent. Instead of focusing on keeping current talent they’re investing more in recruiting new people to keep up with turnover.

According to a report published by the Society of Human Resource Management, companies spend an average of $4,426 per candidate with more than 50% of turnover happening in the new hires first year of employment. Companies lose $11 billion every year due to turnover because they’re neglecting current talent and focusing on attracting new.

Here are four ways companies can get the most out of their current talent

Cultivating Open Communication With Clear Expectations

Setting expectations doesn’t solely revolve around the goals of the actual position but also expands to cultural expectations, understanding the hierarchy and the contribution to an overall purpose.

Flattening the layers of the hierarchy and eliminating the micromanagement associated with them increases involvement and performance. Phil Shawe, CEO of TransPerfect, has found “when employees feel connected to the company and their management, they’re naturally more loyal.” He said, ”fostering a close-knit management team tends to inspire people to always consider the big picture and the overall well-being of the company when approaching business decisions.”

Keith R. Sbiral, a certified professional coach with Apochromatik says “open communication is a key component of a driven team.” Keeping employees involved in projects and processes keeps them motivated while increasing trust. Setting clear and specific expectations is one of the most impactful things managers can do for their employees.

Promoting Entrepreneurial Mindsets

Many companies are resistant to nurturing an entrepreneurial mindset in their employees for fear they’ll lose top talent. The reality is, a true entrepreneur is going to leave a company regardless how great their position is. Companies who aren’t afraid to let their employees leave show their current team they value their growth and development.

Hult International Business School describes an entrepreneurial mindset as “people with an appetite to do things differently and a talent for coming up with fresh ideas.” Employees that are given the freedom to think outside of the box are more innovative in finding more efficient ways of doing typical tasks.

Susana Yee of Digital Everything Consulting hires people who are hungry to create, grow and learn. She coaches them to better understand their thought process to solutions. After discussing possible solutions, she gives them “as much freedom as they want to solve those problems” empowering them to achieve more than they thought possible.

Fiona Adler, Founder of Actioned, fosters an entrepreneurial mindset through ownership and accountability. She created a system using a shared spreadsheet where everyone writes out their top actions for the day. As each person completes their top actions they cross them off keeping everyone updated on their own tasks. This helps to show how each person is contributing to the project. Every team member is held accountable for their daily tasks making them more deliberate about what they’re going to do for the day.

Investing in Their Development

A business is only as strong as their weakest employee. Gallup found that 87% of the new generation values professional career growth and development opportunities, yet 74% don’t feel they’re reaching their full potential.

When employees feel valued their loyalty increases reducing the overall turnover. This doesn’t always require financial output, it can be as simple as opening lines of communication, increasing responsibility and defining their journey throughout the organization.

Matt Ross, Co-founder and COO of RIZKNOWS and The Slumber Yard believes the best investment is empowering his employees by letting them take control over a project, campaign or department. Since taking a step back from directing his employees on how to do certain aspects of their job, Ross quickly realized his employees “want to feel like they’re making an impact on the business instead of just taking and executing orders.”

Driving Growth With Gestures

Giving praise is a simple and powerful way to build a sustainable culture. A lack of recognition leads to a dying culture. Employees are no longer motivated by their paycheck alone but instead fueled by praise and incentives. Recognition comes in various forms and can be as simple as a thank you. The way a business recognizes employees is entirely dependent on the culture.

The founder of Accelerated Growth Marketing, Stacy Caprio, believes in treating her employees as “an actual person.” She does this by “asking them about their day as well as letting them know they are appreciated and thanking them when they do a good job.”

Adham Sbeih at Socotra Capital implemented a peer recognition program where employees acknowledge their peers when they do something that demonstrates the company core values. He calls it “a goodie.” It doesn’t just stop there, employees are then recognized in an email blast with a detailed explanation of what they did and how it aligns to the company core values with a $25 gift card.

Companies who invest in their employees can extend their tenure by years. Start by opening up communication and creating conversations about what they need and collaborate on creating an effective strategy.

 

This article was written by Heidi Lynne Kurter from Forbes and was legally licensed through the NewsCred publisher network. Please direct all licensing questions to legal@newscred.com.

1.3.19 post.png

Trust is often cited by relationship experts as the key to a long-lasting and successful union. But trust is also an essential ingredient in your workplace relationships, impacting employee satisfaction, retention, and even productivity.

In a 2016 global CEO survey, 55% of CEOs said a lack of trust poses a threat to the ability of their organization to grow. And, a recent study published in Harvard Business Review shows they are right.According to the study, people working in high-trust companies reported 74% less stress than those working in low-trust companies. They also report 106% more energy at work, 13% fewer sick days, 76% more engagement, 29% more satisfaction with their lives, and 40% less burnout. All of these factors fuel stronger performance. Trust, it seems, is at the core of a strong company culture.

Jeff Yurcisin, president of Zulily, agrees. He argues trust is critical to Zulily’s success. As a fast-paced company, Zulily encourages employees to feel empowered to take ownership of their work. However, Yurcisin says this empowerment doesn’t happen if trust does not exist among colleagues and between employees and their managers.

So, how can you build a culture of trust in your workplace?

Foster Open Communication

“The best thing any leader can do to earn trust is facilitate transparency,” says Yurcisin. In addition to all managers having an open-door policy to encourage communication within their teams, Zulily also hosts bi-weekly company-wide meetings, allowing for open communication among the entire staff of 3,500 people in real time.

During these meetings, Zulily shares news with all employees, addresses concerns, and ensures everyone is aligned to the company’s goals and mission. “While we also rely on emails, newsletters and a company intranet, we believe in the interpersonal communication channels,” says Yurcisin. This transparency helps to build a culture of trust among employees and the leadership team.

Show a Clear Path

According to the Harvard Business Review, only 40% of employees report being well informed about their company’s goals. Uncertainty about the direction the company is taking or inconsistency in messages leads to chronic stress among employees and erodes feelings of trust between employees and the management team.

Ensuring employees are clear about the company’s goals including where the company is going and how they will get there leads to a more engaged workforce that is unified around a shared purpose and helps to build trust within the company.

This doesn’t mean you have to have all the answers. “When it comes to instilling trust between managers and employees, what’s most important is first establishing a shared mission. A clear goal,” says Yuricisn. Leaders may not have all the answers, and that’s okay. Being honest about the things you don’t know can actually help to establish your credibility.

Recognize Your Talent

According to the Harvard Business Review, recognition has a large impact on trustworthiness.

Yurcisin says Zulily attempts to ensure that every employee in each department is celebrated, both at an individual level within their departments, and through all-company communications. This recognition helps to ensure that employees don’t just feel like another number.

“Though it’s tempting in today’s data-driven culture to reduce people to mere data, what engages people is human connection, and that’s done by sharing each other’s stories,” says Yurcisin. By telling these success stories and highlighting the work that’s being done across the company–from the accounts payable team to the logistics team–you can earn trust and align staff to the broader mission of the company by demonstrating these important contributions to the company’s shared goals.

Allow for Failure

Imagine working in an environment where you are too afraid to try something new because failing may mean you’ll be issued a pink slip.

Yurcisin says Zulily has adopted a policy of embracing failure, even adding some humor to mistakes. He speaks of the website’s tech team, who have a small pig figurine that gets passed around to engineers who crash the site. “It’s our way of celebrating failure,” says Yurcisin. “That mistake is a way for our team to learn what works and what doesn’t,” he says. Allowing your team to learn through failure instills trust that enables that creativity and ingenuity to happen.

Keep Your Word

Trust is not built overnight, or in a single meeting, but is something that is established over time through every interaction an employee has with another team member. Encourage everyone in the company to stay true to their word. If you schedule a meeting with someone, make sure you show up. If you say you’ll get something done, do it. Building a culture of trust begins with these small acts.

Get Personal

Leaders can foster a culture of trust by encouraging employees to be open and honest about their professional goals. Encouraging an open and candid conversation about employees’ career paths and opportunities, listening to each team member, and understanding them on a human level is critical to building trust.

 

This article was written by Lisa Evans from Fast Company and was legally licensed through the NewsCred publisher network. Please direct all licensing questions to legal@newscred.com.

long-hill-twp-opening

Sumara and Imran Ahmad, owners of the newest Goddard School located in Long Hill, NJ, are one step closer to fulfilling their dream of opening a preschool.

CLICK HERE TO READ MORE>>>>

Central Pa. Goddard School Will Expand

Tuesday, December 18th, 2018

york-pa-expansion

The Goddard School located in York, PA is expanding. The new facility will be similar to the current building but will also include an indoor play space, outdoor STEAM (science, technology, engineering, arts and mathematics) and music classrooms, a faculty lounge and a kindergarten classroom.

CLICK HERE TO READ MORE>>>>

Management Tip: Calmness Counts

Thursday, December 13th, 2018

12.13.18 post.png

Over the years I’ve spoken with a small army of people who’ve told me essentially the same thing: They had a good job but they just couldn’t take the agitated, excitable, too-high-octane temperament of their boss.

Or to put it another, simpler way, as the old management saying goes, “People leave managers, not companies.”

It was a phenomenon I came upon repeatedly as I was researching my book The Type B Manager. Too much intensity can wear employees down. While calmness is something employees can rarely get too much  of. The more, the better.

This makes good sense when you realize that, at its core, management is all about accomplishing work through others. Following are three reasons why calmness is a substantive managerial asset.

It’s reassuring.  Calmness inspires confidence. It’s a leadership style people want to follow. In most jobs (less so in the remote working world of course), you spend a lot of time with your boss. It’s only natural to want to feel comfortable about that — rather than having your stomach perpetually tied in knots.

It creates a better environment to solve business problems.  It helps employees (and organizations) make good decisions. The best decisions are well-thought-out and analytical, calmly and rationally made. Impulsive decisions made in the heat of the moment (why do I keep thinking of a certain president here?) are generally not the best way for any management to operate.

It’s conducive to loyalty and productivity. Employees respond well to calmness. Over the long term it’s a pleasant, easy attribute to work with. Employees are apt to remain loyal to a calm, effective manager. And long-term loyalty breeds productivity.

Calmness isn’t one of those big marquee qualities we tend to hear a lot about when celebrating rock star executives. But it probably should be.

 

This article was written by Victor Lipman from Forbes and was legally licensed through the NewsCred publisher network. Please direct all licensing questions to legal@newscred.com.

Goddard School Opening in Westport

Tuesday, December 11th, 2018

westport-i-open

The Goddard School of Westport, CT is anticipated to open in the summer of 2019.

CLICK HERE TO READ MORE>>>>

pn-nov-convention-logo

Goddard Systems, Inc.’s (GSI), the franchisor of The Goddard School, annual franchisee convention was held in Nassau, Bahamas. Recipients of its yearly awards were announced to honor model franchisees who contribute to their communities through service-based projects and provide high-quality childcare with leading health and safety practices.

Goddard School franchisees attend the convention because they know it is essential to running a successful business.

“Ideas generated in workshops and time spent with fellow owners keep you up on latest trends and changes in the industry/business. Networking is paramount at these events and provides so much connection amongst GSI and Franchisees,” said Barbra Bryan from Mooresville, NC.

GSI is proud to present the 2018 convention award categories and winners:

Brand Ambassador Award

·         Vince and Nancy Radosta, Castle Rock, CO

Humanitarian Award

·         Leisa Byars, Hendersonville, TN

·         Anthony and Ada Vassallo, Norwood, NJ

Leadership Award

·         John Agaman, Sparks, NV

Philip Schumacher Award

·         Shauna and Jeff Barison, Redmond Ridge, WA

Rookie of the Year Award

·         Brooks Coatney, Fayetteville, AR

Circle of Excellence for Education Award

·         Dolly and Monty Kalsi, Bethlehem, PA

·         Mark and Wendy Reinhart, Anderson Township, OH

·         Mike and Janelle Glasser, Bare Hills, MD

·         Butch and Maria Aggen, Cedar Park, TX

·         Jim and Debbie Womack, Chesterfield, VA

·         Dina and Matt Speranza, Cranberry Township, PA

·         Amber and Dave O’Brien, Forest Hill, MD

·         Jim and Jill Worley, Gaithersburg, MD

·         Susan Hoy and Tim Hoy, Hillsborough, NJ

·         Michael Smithers, Ladera Ranch, CA

·         Kellie McDonald, Lake Orion, MI

·         Dipti Singh, Millersville, MD

·         Shauna and Jeff Barison, Redmond Ridge, WA

·         Ryan and Chelli Motherway, South Reno, NV

·         Denise Cross, Reno (Somersett), NV

·         Melanie and Bill Hyatt, Simpsonville, SC

·         Lissa Knox and Erin Goulet, Snohomish, WA

·         John, Jody and Kristen Agaman, Sparks, NV

·         Ted and Robin Ray, Sugar Hill, GA

·         David and Donna Raye, Third Lake, IL

·         Fran and Bryant Lubbs, Wayne, PA

Circle of Excellence for Operations Award

·         Olivia Teja and Kamal Desilva, Bellevue, WA

·         Angela Norman, Centerville, OH

·         Kate Joseph, Cincinnati, OH

·         Jim and Jill Worley, Gaithersburg, MD

·         Jyoti Verma, Henderson, NV

·         Kellie McDonald, Lake Orion, MI

·         Sheeba Mathew, Marriottsville, MD

·         Dipti Singh, Millersville, MD

·         Wendy Somers, Newtown, PA

·         Bob and Lori Santo, Peters Township, PA

·         Melanie and Bill Hyatt, Simpsonville, SC

·         Pete Joseph, South Lebanon, OH

·         John, Jody and Kristen Agaman, Sparks, NV

·         Ted and Robin Ray, Sugar Hill, GA

Circle of Excellence President’s Club Award

·         Jim and Jill Worley, Gaithersburg, MD

·         Kellie McDonald, Lake Orion, MI

·         Dipti Singh, Millersville, MD

·         Melanie and Bill Hyatt, Simpsonville, SC

·         John, Jodi and Kristen Agaman, Sparks, NV

·         Ted and Robin Ray, Sugar Hill, GA

Outstanding Market Award – Phoenix, AZ

·         Nicole and Matt Bigham and Beth and Vince Valentino, Buckeye (Verrado), AZ

·         Jake Thompson, Cave Creek, AZ

·         Todd and Christine Goldberg, Chandler, AZ

·         Van Phan, Gilbert (Higley), AZ

·         Penny Mekhanik, Gilbert (East Germann), AZ

·         Karen and Keith Latchaw, Gilbert (Warner), AZ

·         Natalia Elfimova, Scottsdale, AZ

·         JoEllen Johnson, Goodyear, AZ

Outstanding Customer Experience Award

·         Todd and Christine Goldberg, Chandler, AZ

Director of the Year Award

·         Stacey Molnar (director), Karyn Smykowski and Suzanne Hanf (owners), Toms River, NJ

Anthony A. Martino Scholarship Award

·         Sabreena Leach and Cindy Pyatt, Oakville, MO

 

“As proven by this year’s honorees, choosing to operate a School is more than just a good business decision,” said Joe Schumacher, CEO of GSI. “Our franchisees choose to make a profound impact on the lives of future generations.”

The Goddard School focuses on learning through play for children from six weeks to six years old. This year marks the system’s 30th anniversary in business. Learn more about franchising opportunities with The Goddard School at www.goddardschoolfranchise.com

The Top 4 Childcare Franchises of 2018/19

Friday, November 30th, 2018

goddard-school-article

After interviewing thousands of franchisees across hundreds of brands, Franchise Business Review ranked The Goddard School among its ‘4 Best Childcare Franchise Opportunities’

CLICK HERE TO READ MORE!