Archive for the ‘Business Development’ Category

Sheetal Patel is the onsite owner of the newest Goddard School opening up in Pearland, TX.

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Goddard Systems, Inc.’s (GSI), the franchisor of The Goddard School, annual franchisee convention was held in Nassau, Bahamas. Recipients of its yearly awards were announced to honor model franchisees who contribute to their communities through service-based projects and provide high-quality childcare with leading health and safety practices.

Goddard School franchisees attend the convention because they know it is essential to running a successful business.

“Ideas generated in workshops and time spent with fellow owners keep you up on latest trends and changes in the industry/business. Networking is paramount at these events and provides so much connection amongst GSI and Franchisees,” said Barbra Bryan from Mooresville, NC.

GSI is proud to present the 2018 convention award categories and winners:

Brand Ambassador Award

·         Vince and Nancy Radosta, Castle Rock, CO

Humanitarian Award

·         Leisa Byars, Hendersonville, TN

·         Anthony and Ada Vassallo, Norwood, NJ

Leadership Award

·         John Agaman, Sparks, NV

Philip Schumacher Award

·         Shauna and Jeff Barison, Redmond Ridge, WA

Rookie of the Year Award

·         Brooks Coatney, Fayetteville, AR

Circle of Excellence for Education Award

·         Dolly and Monty Kalsi, Bethlehem, PA

·         Mark and Wendy Reinhart, Anderson Township, OH

·         Mike and Janelle Glasser, Bare Hills, MD

·         Butch and Maria Aggen, Cedar Park, TX

·         Jim and Debbie Womack, Chesterfield, VA

·         Dina and Matt Speranza, Cranberry Township, PA

·         Amber and Dave O’Brien, Forest Hill, MD

·         Jim and Jill Worley, Gaithersburg, MD

·         Susan Hoy and Tim Hoy, Hillsborough, NJ

·         Michael Smithers, Ladera Ranch, CA

·         Kellie McDonald, Lake Orion, MI

·         Dipti Singh, Millersville, MD

·         Shauna and Jeff Barison, Redmond Ridge, WA

·         Ryan and Chelli Motherway, South Reno, NV

·         Denise Cross, Reno (Somersett), NV

·         Melanie and Bill Hyatt, Simpsonville, SC

·         Lissa Knox and Erin Goulet, Snohomish, WA

·         John, Jody and Kristen Agaman, Sparks, NV

·         Ted and Robin Ray, Sugar Hill, GA

·         David and Donna Raye, Third Lake, IL

·         Fran and Bryant Lubbs, Wayne, PA

Circle of Excellence for Operations Award

·         Olivia Teja and Kamal Desilva, Bellevue, WA

·         Angela Norman, Centerville, OH

·         Kate Joseph, Cincinnati, OH

·         Jim and Jill Worley, Gaithersburg, MD

·         Jyoti Verma, Henderson, NV

·         Kellie McDonald, Lake Orion, MI

·         Sheeba Mathew, Marriottsville, MD

·         Dipti Singh, Millersville, MD

·         Wendy Somers, Newtown, PA

·         Bob and Lori Santo, Peters Township, PA

·         Melanie and Bill Hyatt, Simpsonville, SC

·         Pete Joseph, South Lebanon, OH

·         John, Jody and Kristen Agaman, Sparks, NV

·         Ted and Robin Ray, Sugar Hill, GA

Circle of Excellence President’s Club Award

·         Jim and Jill Worley, Gaithersburg, MD

·         Kellie McDonald, Lake Orion, MI

·         Dipti Singh, Millersville, MD

·         Melanie and Bill Hyatt, Simpsonville, SC

·         John, Jodi and Kristen Agaman, Sparks, NV

·         Ted and Robin Ray, Sugar Hill, GA

Outstanding Market Award – Phoenix, AZ

·         Nicole and Matt Bigham and Beth and Vince Valentino, Buckeye (Verrado), AZ

·         Jake Thompson, Cave Creek, AZ

·         Todd and Christine Goldberg, Chandler, AZ

·         Van Phan, Gilbert (Higley), AZ

·         Penny Mekhanik, Gilbert (East Germann), AZ

·         Karen and Keith Latchaw, Gilbert (Warner), AZ

·         Natalia Elfimova, Scottsdale, AZ

·         JoEllen Johnson, Goodyear, AZ

Outstanding Customer Experience Award

·         Todd and Christine Goldberg, Chandler, AZ

Director of the Year Award

·         Stacey Molnar (director), Karyn Smykowski and Suzanne Hanf (owners), Toms River, NJ

Anthony A. Martino Scholarship Award

·         Sabreena Leach and Cindy Pyatt, Oakville, MO

 

“As proven by this year’s honorees, choosing to operate a School is more than just a good business decision,” said Joe Schumacher, CEO of GSI. “Our franchisees choose to make a profound impact on the lives of future generations.”

The Goddard School focuses on learning through play for children from six weeks to six years old. This year marks the system’s 30th anniversary in business. Learn more about franchising opportunities with The Goddard School at www.goddardschoolfranchise.com

Goddard School Opens in Woodbury

Friday, November 30th, 2018

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Franchisee, Shannon Gehrmann and her husband fell in love with The Goddard School, located near their home in the Chicago suburbs when they were new parents. Now they have opened their own School located in Woodbury, MN.

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The Top 4 Childcare Franchises of 2018/19

Friday, November 30th, 2018

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After interviewing thousands of franchisees across hundreds of brands, Franchise Business Review ranked The Goddard School among its ‘4 Best Childcare Franchise Opportunities’

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6 Lessons from Successful Entrepreneurs

Friday, November 30th, 2018

Goddard Systems, Inc. CEO Joe Schumacher is featured in the Fox Business article, ‘6 lessons from successful entrepreneurs,’ where he gives advice on how to learn and grow from failure.

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Entrepreneurs bring all sorts of skill-sets to their venture, such as the ability to sell, or to organize activity, or to raise funding. Some might have a business background, but others might need to learn the ways of business while on the job. Here are 14 terms you and every entrepreneur should know, because they involve central concepts that affect your business.

Accounts receivable:

Money owed to your business by clients. Typically, you invoice a client and receive payment some time later. An account is receivable until it is paid.

Assets:

Economic resources your business owns. Current assets are items like cash, receivables and inventory. Long-term assets include equipment, buildings, vehicles, furniture and patents. You utilize assets to generate income.

Capital:

These are the total resources available to your business, and is equal to your equity and debt. Working capital is equal to current assets minus current liabilities, and represents the resources available to run day-to-day operations.

Cash flow:

The movement of money into, through and out of your business. Inflows bring in money and include collections of sales revenues, tax refunds, and interest earned. Outflows are expenditures of cash and include payment of expenses and acquisition of assets.

Depreciation:

The decrease in the value of long-term assets due to the passage of time. Depreciation is a tax-deductible expense that spans a set number of years.

Equity:

Your ownership interest in your company. It is equal to your assets minus your liabilities. Equity is evidences by stock shares distributed to owners based on their percentage of ownership.

Expenses:

The costs of running your business, including rent, salaries, legal costs, advertising, taxes paid, and utilities. A good business tries to minimize expenses while not skimping on essentials.

Financial statements:

Highly structured reports that indicate your business’ financial condition. They include the balance sheet (a snapshot of assets, liabilities and equity), income statement (revenues and expenses for a given period), and cash flow statement (inflows and outflows for a given period).

Liabilities:

Debt owed by your business. Current liabilities are due within one year and include obligations to pay credit-card balances, invoices from suppliers, taxes due, and wages earned but not yet paid. Long-term liabilities include mortgages and loans that mature in more than one year.

Losses:

Negative net income, created when your costs exceed your revenues. If you have too many losses, the chances are that your business will fail unless you have other sources of funds.

Profits:

Also called net income or the bottom line, these are revenues minus costs for a given period. Profits can be drawn off by owners or accumulated in an account called retained earnings. You can use profits to expand your company.

Revenues:

Also called gross income and sales, this is the money you earn from operations. You direct your marketing and sales activities to generate revenues.

Valuation:

A number representing how much your business is worth. Valuation is important when you are seeking funding from investors.

You don’t need to be a financial expert to have a successful business, but knowing basic financial terms will help you communicate with other stakeholders. For those wanting to broaden their knowledge, the Internet is loaded with learning resources, and many colleges offer continuing education courses that might be useful.

This article originally appeared in IOU Financial.

 

This article was written by Robert Gloer from Business2Community and was legally licensed through the NewsCred publisher network. Please direct all licensing questions to legal@newscred.com.

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Standards set the bar for achievement, and in business, that bar raises and shifts position. No wonder professionals often burnout — they’re competing in a rat race, never making it out of the maze. Work culture must move from a focus on performance to a focus on learning.

The prioritization of performance over learning persists in education, where the root of the issue lies. Many studies have shown test results are not accurate indicators of student potential, talent and knowledge. Still, the goal remains to get the A and move on to the next score goal, rather than truly learning the material — as if they’re given the time to do so in the first place. When students graduate, this damaging mindset often persists in work culture.

There’s nothing wrong with challenging yourself, but without learning, you continue to fight the same fight. You lose in the end when you burn out and limit your potential as a professional. Prioritize education to achieve improved, sustainable performance over the long-term with these four tips.

  1. Ask for Feedback

Like tests, annual performance reviews rarely get into the nitty-gritty of generating improvement. This once-a-year picture usually fails the employer and employee. Feedback notes feel like a chore for both parties and don’t encourage growth or nurture development of talents.

Feedback must function collaboratively — employees want and deserve better feedback. Of all generations, millennial workers most desire regular feedback, but every worker should frequently seek it out.

CEOs should also seek feedback from their employees. More constructive, transparent and positive feedback opens the door to improved trust, communication and performance. View feedback as a learning opportunity on the road to improved performance.

  1. Focus on Learning Outcomes

Reviews measure how someone performs at a specific time, offering only a snapshot of an employee’s work while a focus on learning stretches the view longitudinally. Regular reviews help track the results of knowledge and provide a more holistic vantage point of learning through time. The focus on both performance and learning outcomes adds value to employee contribution and growth, but a broader lens is needed to nurture success and growth.

Develop a customized feedback process with your supervisor and plan timeframes during which you’ll regularly ask for feedback. Communicate your learning objectives to measure your performance more holistically and get a better view of how on-track you are to achieving your learning outcomes. You’ll feel less stressed and more focused on your professional development.

  1. Participate in Mentoring

Open up mentoring opportunities for yourself to gain knowledge and give back to those rising in the ranks. Do you admire a specific professional or entrepreneur? Arrange a time for a coffee meetup — your treat — to discuss the possibility of a mentorship.

Come to the table with your learning objectives and possible outcomes in mind. Don’t worry if what you have outlined feels abstract — this is part of the learning process. You’re gathering information and developing a pathway to learn and grow professionally.

Senior-level employees who give back usually feel good about passing on their knowledge but could stand to learn more about how they work through the process of exchange. Of Fortune 500 companies, 71 percent offer mentoring programs for employees because they realize the proven link between learning and performance.

Does the company offer mentoring programs? Why not be the first to pitch this as an idea and help set it up? Cultivate something bigger than one employee — an opportunity that benefits you in the long run, too.

  1. Pursue Enrichment Opportunities

Achieving the work-life balance feels like trying to clone a dinosaur — nearly impossible. You must make the time. Build a full life in your personal and professional worlds by pursuing enrichment opportunities.

Enrichment opportunities is a broad term, but one that encompasses endless potential. What opportunities for learning exist on the job and in your personal life? Take advantage of exercise programs, employer tuition reimbursement and stipends for night or online classes. Attend that life drawing or marketing class you always wanted to schedule.

What opportunities might you cultivate by talking to the right people and pitching the right ideas? Speak up.

Research reveals that satisfaction among employees relies on having a fulfilling experience on the job. One study found employers who deepened worker knowledge through enrichment opportunities possessed higher motivated teams and company loyalty. The workers were also more productive and happier due to benefits and programs that promoted recognition, achievement, advancement and responsibility.

It’s possible to achieve the right balance of completing duties and pursuing growth through learning. Open up the lines of communication toward a culture of knowledge and enrichment, and productivity and performance will follow. Honor quality over quantity.

Don’t let your focus on performance hold you back from the wealth of the learning experience. By redirecting your attention to creating learning objectives and outcomes, you can broaden your horizons and improve your performance over time.

This article originally appeared in Personal Branding Blog.

 

This article was written by Personal Branding Blog from Business2Community and was legally licensed through the NewsCred publisher network. Please direct all licensing questions to legal@newscred.com.

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A solid team can make or break your business. Even if you are a control person, you can’t handle everything in your business. Having team members you can trust and rely on makes a huge difference.

While finding a promising team can seem like a challenge, keeping those people onboard and happy should be your true focus. That way, you can focus on long-term goals and start to build a routine.

Here are some tips for keeping team members happy.

Set Clear Expectations

As the business owner, you have to clearly define your expectations for team members. Make sure you communicate effectively about job roles and what you expect. If you notice any issues or slip-ups early on, be sure to address them so everyone is on the same page.

When your team knows what you want and expectations are set, it makes it easier for all parties to be happy with the process.

Show Appreciation

Showing appreciation is important and easy to do. Members of your team may be the first people to interact with clients or customers on your behalf. If they’re doing good work, be sure to say thank you. A nice gesture around the holidays is also a nice way to show appreciation.

Make the hierarchy in the business as flat as possible and you will have an appreciated and engaged staff. Encourage your frontline staff to be creative in coming up with new ideas and ask for feedback on what the clients really want.

Make the Environment Pleasant and Comfortable

Every business has a company culture even if you just work virtually. You want each team member to fit in and feel comfortable with the way things are run.

Be sure to make the workplace as comfortable as can be with suitable conveniences and regular team meetings so everyone can interact. If you’re working in an office give your employees the freedom to personalize their workspaces.

When I worked for a small business, I loved the environment. We got to decorate the office and our workspaces and there were often weekly informal meetings to discuss the team’s progress and share suggestions.

Reward Small Achievements

Nothing makes employees like being recognized for the small and big things. It doesn’t have to be anything major. A simple ‘thank you’ email or an inquiry on how your employees spent their weekend. Your employees are more likely to feel great about their work when they know you care about them.

You may also want to take things a step further and incentivize certain activities that your team helps with. At a previous job, my boss offered Amazon gift cards to anyone who could get a client to leave a review on our company on Google or Yelp. Your reward doesn’t have to be monetary either. You could consider doing an ’employee of the month’ type of recognition easily.

Consider Offering Benefits

Depending on the size of your business, it may or may not make sense to offer employee benefits. Doing so, however, can make a big difference and lead to employee retention.

If you have part-time team members or can’t afford to provide benefits like health insurance or a retirement plan, consider other benefits your team members may enjoy. Providing a monthly gym membership may not cost much but can help your team members focus on their health. Maybe you have a product or service that your team can get for free or at a discount when working for your business.

If you run an online business, structure work schedules to allow unlimited vacation days and time off so long as team members meet their deadlines.

At the end of the day, be mindful that with no staff there may not be a business. Focus on keeping your team members happy and treating them with respect to grow your business.

How do you keep your team members happy and productive?

This article originally appeared in Calendar.

 

This article was written by Choncé Maddox from Business2Community and was legally licensed through the NewsCred publisher network. Please direct all licensing questions to legal@newscred.com.

00The piece highlights Goddard’s volunteer hours policy, in which employees have paid time off/flexible work hours to engage in volunteer projects.

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In the competitive world of business, it is vital that you are always on the look-out for opportunities to take your operation to the next level. Otherwise, it will be near impossible for you to stand out from your competitors and to make an impressive impact on your area of the industry. With so many options available to you, the prospect of expanding your business might feel overwhelming. That is why you should establish a clear plan and take this process one step at a time. Below are five pieces of advice that will help you to do this.

Aim high with your networking plans

As a business owner, it is vital that you are an expert at networking. Failing to successfully interact with your industry peers will make it extremely difficult for you to move your business forward. That is why you should attend at least one networking event per month. You should also look out for events that aren’t specifically for networking purposes but could still be a great chance for you to find new contacts. For instance, you could attend the launch party of another company. If it is an organization that you admire, you should use this as an opportunity to meet with their branding experts, their public relations team, and their accountancy firm. Once you have identified these professionals, you could pick their brains or find out if they would be willing to provide you with a similar service. During the networking process, you should endeavor to aim one step higher than your own business. Of course, it is important to have contacts on your own level. However, you should also look out for businesses that are a little further on than you. Associating with these companies will help you to appear successful by association. It could also give you access to their resources and help you to secure impressive trade deals.

Work with the right organizations

In order to avoid time-consuming and costly mistakes, you need to ensure you are working with the right organizations. Instead of going it alone, it is a good idea to find experts in expansion. This is especially important if you have no prior experience in growing a business. If you are determined to benefit from competitive marketing strategies, online marketing, website developing services, content marketing, business and cost analysis, and vendor management, you should go online to learn more. Not only will this help you to grow your business, but it will also allow you to do so on an online platform. This is a fantastic way for you to thrive in the modern world and to engage with a younger audience. It is also a great opportunity for you to push your expansion outside of your local area. If your organization has the potential to function nationally or even globally, why place limits on your success?

Take your business national or even global

If you are determined to see your business conquer the world, it is important that you create a clear plan for expansion. Although it is essential that you aim high, you don’t want to run the risk of spreading yourself too thinly. That is why you need to ensure your local business is running effectively. Before you make any big moves, you should take a step back and evaluate your existing operation. Are there any areas where you could be saving money? Perhaps you could automate an element of your production. Or, maybe you could consider moving your business to the cloud. Whatever you decide, the most important thing is that you come to these conclusions before pushing forward with your plans for growth. Otherwise, you could end up making the same mistakes on a larger scale. Another important step is to invest in your human resources department. As your business grows, it is likely that you will have to delegate even more of your important tasks. This will give you the time you need to focus your attention on more pressing matters. In order to make this a straightforward process, you need to ensure you have the right people working for you. This is your best chance of managing your stress levels. It is also a great way for you to protect staff morale, as you don’t want to face giving your team more work than they can handle.

Make clever investments

If you are hoping to successfully take your business to the next level, you will also need to get your finances in order. You can achieve this by establishing an impressive investment portfolio. This could involve anything from backing smaller businesses to purchasing stocks and shares. You should also have multiple savings accounts on the go, with funds that can be directed towards different areas of your operation. Whilst there are a number of benefits to going it alone, it is vital that you also consider securing a substantial loan. Although this could be a risky strategy, it could also be a great way for your business to gain momentum. Instead of taking lots of small steps that are spread out over a number of years, a huge injection of cash could help you to move your business forward at lightning speed. This is a fantastic way for you to create a buzz around your company and to establish a large following.

Get feedback from your clients

Finally, you should endeavor to get helpful feedback from your customers. This is an essential step if you are going to avoid alienating your existing client base. As your business grows, it is important that you don’t lose sight of your customer care. Of course, you will want to generate impressive profits, but this should never be at the expense of the services you provide. That is why you should send out anonymous surveys to your company mailing list. You should also host an online live chat, where loyal customers can offer constructive feedback, urgent complaints, and uplifting compliments. Then, after you have collected the necessary information, you will know whether or not you need to drive more money into your customer relations team. It will also be easier for you to put together useful staff training days that will help your operation to stay on track.

 


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