Posts Tagged ‘Leadership’

“[The Goddard School] is a community-based business, and it’s important to know that our franchisees are on-site operators. This creates not only a stronger bond with parents and students but also adds an extra layer of accountability for franchisees.” – Joe Schumacher, CEO, Goddard Systems, Inc.

Read the full article in American Builders Quarterly here.

Joseph Schumacher, CEO of Goddard Systems and its 410 locations, traces his franchising career back to 1977 at Maaco.

Click here to read the full article by Kerry Pipes for Franchising.com.

Goddard Systems, Inc. (GSI), franchisor of The Goddard School®, a leader in franchised educational childcare for 25 years, is pleased to announce the appointment of Maureen Corneal as Vice President of Marketing, Advertising and Public Relations.

Ms. Corneal, a seasoned marketing and strategic communications professional, will focus on the strategic direction and implementation of the company’s marketing, advertising, public relations and market research efforts on behalf of its network of nearly 400 franchised Goddard School locations across the nation. She will serve as part of the company’s senior leadership team and will report to GSI Chief Operating Officer (COO) Dzana Homan.

“We are thrilled to have Maureen join our team,” said Dzana Homan. “Her experience across the spectrum of grade levels will help us communicate that learning is a lifelong process, and it starts with the decisions and commitments made in early childhood education.”

“A large part of my role with GSI will be to further the brand’s stellar reputation as a trusted industry leader. Goddard is poised for smart, strategic growth, and our marketing initiatives will focus on repeatable, optimal and sustainable results, much of which is based on research and analytics and understanding our customers,” said Ms. Corneal. “Goddard is all about families, relationships, and meaningful communication; we want to stay in close touch with parents’ interests, behaviors and ideals on what is important for their children.”

Ms. Corneal’s background includes advertising agency, franchising, market research and analytics experience. She started her career at Sylvan Learning Centers where she first established her focus on education organizations and gained experience with franchise marketing communications.

Prior to joining GSI, Ms. Corneal served five years as Vice President of Marketing and Strategic Initiatives and four years as Executive Director of Marketing and Brand Communication for Laureate Education, Inc., a worldwide network of higher education institutions.

For more information, visit www.goddardschool.com.

Goddard Systems, Inc. (GSI), franchisor of The Goddard School®, a leader in franchised educational childcare for 25 years, is pleased to announce Dr. Craig Bach to serve as its first Vice President for Education.

Dr. Bach, an educational researcher with more than 15 years of experience in both K-12 and postsecondary education, will be responsible for overseeing licensing and compliance, accreditation, quality assurance, training, and curriculum on behalf of the nearly 400 Goddard School locations across the nation. He will serve as part of the company’s senior leadership team and will report to GSI Chief Operating Officer (COO) Dzana Homan.

“In this new role, Dr. Bach will focus on not only continuing to build and retain a network of quality educators, but also to develop metrics to ensure high-quality education is consistently delivered and achieved throughout the system,” said Dzana Homan.

“Part of my role will be to translate the value of the educational work we do to the business side of our organization — positive educational outcomes are not only good for our children, they are good for our business as well,” said Dr. Bach.

Longer term, Dr. Bach will lead a research team to study the impact a Goddard education has at the first, second and third grade levels.

“Assessment and evaluation will be fundamental to everything my team implements at GSI,” said Dr. Bach. “Studies continue to show the importance of early education in building a solid foundation for a child’s academic success. We want to make sure that we build on that research and demonstrate that our educationally rich programs continue to provide children with a foundation for a successful future.”

Prior to joining GSI, Dr. Bach served as the Vice Provost for Institutional Research, Assessment, and Effectiveness and Teaching Professor in the School of Education for Drexel University. During his time with Drexel in the School of Education, he served as Principal Investigator or Co-Principal Investigator on over $5 million in funded projects, including a NASA funded project to use instructional technologies to teach fractal geometry to high school students, the Pennsylvania Department of Education funded Drexel Tech Prep Consortium and a NSF funded grant to develop online mathematics mentoring with the Math Forum.

Dr. Bach also has experience in the for-profit space. He served as the Vice President of the Office of Institutional Effectiveness at Kaplan Higher Education where he managed five teams working on assessment, research, analytics, data management, and performance measurement. Additionally, he worked as an instructional designer for Futurekids — a pre-K to Grade 6 franchise business.

“Our appointment of Dr. Bach comes at an important time in our nation’s emphasis on early childhood education,” said Dzana Homan. “We are impressed with Dr. Bach’s well-rounded experience in the field of education and eager to build on our successful program with his fresh perspective and insights.”

For more information, visit www.goddardschool.com.

Nation’s No. 1 Childcare Franchise Continues Growth with ‘Best in Class’ Financing Program

Goddard Systems, Inc. (GSI), the nation’s No. 1 childcare franchise, refused to slow its growth in 2011. In fact, the 380-plus-school franchise opened 19 new schools while awarding another 28, completely bucking the trend of slow growth in other franchise systems.

The established franchisor was able to continue opening new schools in new territories through the creation of an aggressive, “best in class” financing program designed to help a wider-scope of would-be franchisees get into business for themselves while also aiding existing franchisees’ hopes of opening another school.

“This economy has taught us a lot of lessons,” said Tony Padulo, GSI’s Vice President of Franchise Development. “However, of those lessons, we know we need to think harder and smarter because slower growth is not an option when demand is present. To combat financing limitations, we needed to reinvent our process to be more productive toward more franchisees.”

Throughout 2011, GSI has secured 28 loan commitments, representing $48 million in loan dollars for its franchisees. The loan commitments have helped GSI franchisees secure 22 properties through purchase or lease agreements.

“We strongly feel that one of the best ways to stimulate the economy is through business development. If we didn’t find ways to keep helping would-be franchisees go into business for themselves, our progression would have been limited,” Padulo added, noting that each school employs an average of 20 employees.

GSI’s innovative in-house financing program includes the following:

  • In-house financing team that is dedicated to working with all new franchisees on securing financing. The team pre-screens candidates prior to signing an agreement with GSI. This ensures that GSI is comfortable that the candidates should be able to secure financing for their projects.
  • Relationships with eight preferred lenders. Typically, in this economy, borrowers are required to inject at least 20 percent cash, and in many cases, as much as 30 percent or more. Given GSI’s strong success numbers, its lenders require 15 percent cash injection on a lease, and 10 percent injection on a land purchase, allowing the candidate to keep additional cash for other uses.
  • These loans are most often, if not 100 percent, SBA loans.
  • GSI has strengthened influential relationships. In fact, GSI recently entered into a relationship with Franchise America Finance. Its program is by invitation only, and they will deal with only one franchisor in each segment, typically asking the leader in that segment. GSI was selected in the childcare segment.

“We are deeply protective of the clients we choose to work with,” said Ron Feldman, CEO of Franchise America Finance. “Goddard Systems Inc.’s track record with existing franchisees, business models, earnings and growth projects made them the perfect fit.”

In 2012, GSI fully expects to continue its strong growth projections, including plans to open 16 of schools alongside the awarding of 36 of future schools, Padulo said.

Increasing satisfaction and minimizing problems are the ultimate goals in managing our relationships with customers. Use each customer encounter or point of contact as an opportunity to develop and build trust. Even problems and complaints can be used as a way to go above and beyond expectations in remedying the situation. It’s a good idea to create a system of recording customer interactions to help determine patterns not only in customer complaints, but in their preferences as well.

For example, many luxury hotels observe the choices guests select during their stay, such as extra towels, then extra towels are provided every time that customer visits. Upscale retailers tend to have personal shoppers who record preferences in colors, styles, brands and size so they can notify their client when new merchandise appears.

Adding a personal touch to your interactions with customers can go a long way. It doesn’t always have to be an up sell or business related. Simply paying compliments or asking specific questions about something that was discussed in a previous conversation helps to create that elusive customer loyalty.

Your ROI – Getting Out What You Put In

Tuesday, October 18th, 2011

Most people have heard the quote, “You get out of it what you put into it.” This saying can easily apply to many of life’s endeavors, especially business. Although it may sound cliché, it holds pretty true that you will only get out of your business or career what you put into it. Business is not easy, quite the opposite. It’s hard. If it were easy, everyone would own or run a business. Most successful business professionals struggle to balance it all, wearing many hats, working lots of hours and trying to keep up with the latest and greatest in business and industry. However, a common thread found among the successful is attention to detail. Even with trying to keep all the balls in the air, they understand how the details ultimately will reflect the quality of their work.

Making deposits of time, money and energy now will allow for greater withdrawals in the future. This holds true whether you are an employee seeking a promotion or salary increase, a manager angling for more respect and visibility or a business owner trying to maximize profitability and increase resale potential. Remember, if you want to be able to take out big withdrawals someday, you have to put a lot into your business deposits.

Identifying Your Leadership Position

Tuesday, September 27th, 2011

More often than not, employees in leadership roles are under far more scrutiny than those who are not. Leaders act as the lighthouse of their company – they’re always there for guidance and direction.

What can a leader do to prepare for this role? First, research your job description. It may sound obvious enough, but you may come to find that there is a lot about your role that you didn’t already know. This could be as basic as what your responsibilities are, who reports to you and to whom you report. When you accept the position, ask your supervisor or human resources representative for this information in writing.

Keep this information where it is easily accessible and make a spreadsheet with a list of those who report to you and those to whom you report. Once you feel secure in your responsibilities and chain of command, you can be a shining source of guidance right from the beginning.